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Cooperative Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop and Livestock Reporting Service (Wis.); Federal-State Crop Reporting Service (Wis.) / Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter
Vol. XVI ([covers January 1937/December 1937])

Wisconsin crop and livestock reporter. Vol. XVI, no. 6,   pp. [37]-44 PDF (4.1 MB)


Page [37]


STATE
W IS. 1.F .
WISCONSIN
CROP AND LIVESTOCK REPORTER
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Bureau of Agricultural Economics
WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE & MARKETS
Division of Agricultural Statistics
Federal-State Crop Reporting Service
WALTER H. EBLING, Agricultural Statistician
W. D. BORMUTH, Junior Statistician
FRANCIS J. GRAHAM, Junior Statistician
Vol. XVI, No. 6                State Capitol, Madison, Wisconsin        
       June, 1937
UNLIKE early spring weather con-
ditions, the month of May in Wis-
consin averaged warmer and consider-
ably drier than normal. Rainfall at
most of the important weather sta-
tions in the state was decidedly short
of average and temperatures averaged
above normal at all stations, as is in-
dicated by the accompanying weather
table.
Because of heavy rains late in April
and much cloudy weather in May, as
well as the absence of extremely warm
days, the impression has generally
prevailed that the cool, wet weather
of early spring had continued through
the month of May. As a matter of
fact, since the beginning of May rain
has been decidedly short in most of the
state and temperatures have averaged
almost uniformly higher at t h e
weather stations.
Spring work was seriously delayed
early in the season and most of the
grain was sown quite late. With a
rather dry May there has been a ten-
dency to catch up somewhat on spring
work, and while some corn planting
was late most of it has been planted
at or near the usual time. Because
of the warm days at the end of May
corn has been coming along quite well
on most farms.
Vegetation generally has varied a
good deal. The condition of pasture
in Wisconsin is somewhat above nor-
Condition of Crops, June 1, 1937,
1936, and 10-year Average
(Percent of Normal)
Crop
Winter
wheat -
Rye
Spring
wheat --
Oats.
Barley --
Tame hay
Clover and
timothy
hay
Allilla hay
Wild hay
Pasture --
Canning
peas --
Apples  -
Cherries
1937
84
87
88
87
87
76
76
70
84
83
90
84
90
1936
85
85
86
86
84
85
86
89
82
88
81
61
41
10-yr.
As.
1923-
32
80
83
87
88
88
80
80'
82
82
80
832
80
United States
19
71
37
.5
75.3
68.7
82.3
79 .7
78.4
79 .3
79 .2
67 .6
75.7
87.3
76.6
69 .2
1936
66.7
63.2
66.9
74.5
75.3
75.7
76.4
82 .4
72.3
74.5
79 .6
46.7
57.1.
16-yr.
A,.
1923-
32
73.9
79 .8
82.7
81 .4
82.6
80.6
79 .71
84.8
79.0
81.3
83.54
67.8
IS-year average, 1924-32.
'10-year average, 1923-32.
'12 states.
a Short-time average.
IN THIS ISSUE
Crop Report for June
Prospects are good for winter
grains and fruit crops. Spring
sown grains, hay, and pas-
tures are mostly below nor-
mal.
Farm Stocks of Grain
Supplies of grain on farms have
been low all year because of
the short crops of 1936 and
generally high feed prices.
The carry-over this year will
be small.
Fruit Prospects Good
After the short supply and high
prices of fruit in 1936, an
above average crop of most
tree fruits is in prospect.
Milk Production
In Wisconsin milk production on
June 1 was a little lower than
a year ago. Cow numbers
were down slightly and milk
production per cow was lower.
For the United States milk
production is about three per-
cent higher than a year ago.
Egg Production
In Wisconsin farm flocks in
June show a sharp decline
from May, and egg production
is about two percent smaller
than a year ago. The number
of young chickens being rais-
ed is much smaller than last
year. For the United States
egg  production  is slightly
above a year ago.
Current Changes
While stocks are higher, the
movement of butter and most
other dairy products into stor-
age was about the same as a
year ago.
Prices of Farm Products
Prices of farm products have
declined since last month and
the farm purchasing power is
now at the same level as last
year. The gains of last fall
and winter have been lost
m os t I y because of rising
prices of things farmers buy.
Farm Employment
Fewer persons are employed on
farms than a year ago, the de-
crease being almost entirely
in hired labor.
mal and the winter grains are con-
siderably above normal. Most of the
spring sown grains and the hay crops
are below normal. Fruit trees are re-
ported in good condition.
For the United States a somewhat
different picture exists. The winter
grains generally average below nor-
mal, and of the spring sown grains
only oats show an above normal con-
dition. Pastures as well as hay crops
for the United States show below nor-
mal condition. Fruit crops are gener-
ally above average.
Winter Grain Prospects
Prospects for the production of win-
ter grain continue well above average,
both in Wisconsin and for the country
as a whole. The estimate of winter
wheat in Wisconsin is now placed at
969 thousand bushels and the state's
rye is estimated at 6.253 thousand
bushels, both substantially above aver-
age and the largest production in a
number of years.
For the United States the produc-
tion of winter wheat is estimated
above 648 million bushels and the rye
crop is estimated at nearly 46 million
bushels, both of which are well above
average and much above the small
crops of 1936.
Winter grain acreages are consider-
ably larger this year than last. In
Wisconsin much rye was also planted
last fall because of the serious feed
situation which existed at that time.
With fairly good spring pastures this
year most of this rye has been left for
harvest and with prospective yields
somewhat above average the rye crop
this year will be relatively large. Wis-
consin rye production will probably be
nearly three times as large as a year
ago.
Prospects for the spring sown
grains vary greatlv. In Wisconsin
they were slightly below average in
Indicated Production of Winter
Wheat and Rye
(Thousand Bushels)
Crop          Indicated     1936
June 1937
Wisconsin
Winter wheat .-           969        429
Rye            ,        6,253      2,100
United States
Winter wheat          648,597    519 .013
Rye-45,974                        25,554
S-year
Average
1928-32
605
2 ,189
623.220
38 ,212
q
DOCUM EN'I
REFF I.IBRAR )
_                     l
.
W....;
I


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