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Wisconsin Agricultural Experimental Association / Twentieth annual report of the Wisconsin Agricultural Experiment Association with Tenth annual report of Alfalfa Order. Address of president, secretary's report, and account of the association's activities in promoting progressive agriculture
(1922)

Average yields per acre of the pure bred and pedigreed grains,   p. 34 PDF (168.6 KB)


Page 34


TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT
up, then cultivated 15 times, following which I sowed (on or about
July 21st) an additional 100 pounds of commercial fertilizer (2-12-2),
following which I cultivated once more. The corn was cut and shocked
September 18th to 20th."
Jippa has put his heart and soul into corn improvement, and he is
at his best when telling how he raises and puts up his show samples
and seed corn.
AVERAGE YIELDS PER ACRE OF THE PURE BRED
AND PEDIGREED GRAINS
Average
Variety                                               Yield
Pedigree  Barley -------------------------------------------------------------------48.3
Oats-Pedigree 1 -,,,,--,,,,,    --,--,,,,-------48.9
Pedigree  5  .,,-, ,,-,,.. -------,,--,,,,----------------------------------------------------30.5
Pedigree 7 -3.1--            -........ ------------------ 37.1
Pedigree  Rye ...............- ,-,-,,--,--,--,--,,  ..27.1
Marquis Spring Wheat -, ,,,, ,,                         12.6
No. 7 Corn (Silver King)- ----    ,,,,,,                66.7
No. 12  Corn  (Golden  Glow) ...................... -,,,,,.,,.,,,.,.,,..
-63.5
OUR FOREIGN CONQUESTS
While there is yet a considerable portion of the territory within our
own state where miscellaneous and scrub grains persist, and this terri-
tory should be the battle ground of our increasing efforts to drive out
the scrub population with the pure-bred varieties, at the same time
we have been pioneering in foreign fields, and our conquests have
been remarkably successful.  In several European   and Asiatic
countries, as well as in Australia and South Africa, several of the Wis-
consin grains have long since won their right to permanent citizenship,
and in the Valley of the Nile, one of the most ancient seats of civilized
agriculture, the Wisconsin Silver King corn is now taking its place
beside the date palm and the fig tree. The accompanying cut showing
letter and check from Egypt for a second order of Silver King corn
will be of interest to all who have placed their faith in the pure-bred
grains and who are proud to see their reputation spread and their terri-
tory widened.
34


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