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Murphy, Thomas H. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Vol. 70, Number 3 (Dec. 1968)

Collins, Joan
If you see a crowd, they're skiers,   pp. 8-10


Page 10


to a hiatus when the experts on campus were drafted
to teach ski troops, but in 1947, it was back in action
and placed third in intercollegiate competition.
   Prof. Bradley retired in 1948 after 17 years as ski
benefactor, advisor, participant and charter member. In
the early 1950's the use of the Muir Knoll ski jump
was restricted because a parking lot had been built be-
low the hill. Soon, the wooden planking began to go to
pieces, and in 1956, the jump was condemned. It was
sold to the City of Madison for $700 and was moved
to Hoyt Park, where it stands. With the jump gone
from campus, the Hoofers made a swing to downhill
skiing.
  Today, the club is the largest college organized ski
group in the country. It offers courses on the sport, with
emphasis on safety. Hoofer Ski Club president, Tom
Grenlie, from Waupaca, whose major is real estate
when he isn't planning ski trips and presiding at ski
meetings, said that this season the club will run a first-
aid training class, aimed at ski safety. The ten week
course, open to any student, will be run much like a
GREYHOUND GARAGES FOR MILES AROUND ARE DESERTED
WHEN HOOFERS FILL TWO DOZEN BUSSES FOR A WEEKEND
TRIP TO NORTHERN RESORTS.
regular University course, with homework and exams
included.
  The club has groomed a fine crew of national ski
patrol members. Thirty-five current students have passed
the basic national ski patrol tests and 15 have attained
the senior standing. "We have never sent anyone
through these rigorous senior tests who has not obtained
ski patrol status," Grenlie said. Before major trips, the
officers organize a dry-land school to offer the novice
skiers a few pointers before they head for the slopes.
Once on the slopes, student instructors and members of
the National Ski Patrol give free ski lessons.
  "When we take a major trip, we literally swamp an
area," Grenlie said. "Nearly a third of the skiers on the
slopes during our Northern semester-break trip are
Hoofers, so we feel it is only right that we help with
lessons and first aid." Last winter, the crowd on the trip
10
to Indianhead and Big Powderhorn Mountains in Up-
per Michigan was so large that the only spot big enough
to house an apres-ski dance was the Town Hall, where
students romped and stomped to a rock beat until the
wee hours of the morning.
  Officers for the swinging '68-'69 ski season include,
in addition to Grenlie, Andrea Robinson, New York,
vice president of trips; Cary Hunkel, Milwaukee, vice
THE FIRST CAMPUS SCAFFOLD WAS OF WOOD, WENT UP
IN 1919, AND STAYED UP FOR A DECADE OF FAITHFUL, IF
SOMETIMES CREAKING, WINTER USE.
president of finance; and Jeff Updegraff, Denver, vice
president of policy.
  Already these energetic officers are looking ahead to
1970. They are currently negotiating to set up the
world's first jumbo-jet (390 passengers) charter ski trip
to Europe next winter. And they're dreaming about the
possibility of someday having a plastic ski hill on
campus.
   "We've come a long way the past 50 years-we ex-
pect the next to be even greater!" Grenlie said. *
                                 Wisconsin Alumnus


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