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Richard, George (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Volume 54, Number 10 (May 1953)

Engineer's fair,   pp. 12-13


Page 13


three senators, five assemblymen, and
three citizens appointed by the gover-
nor, which will study "fundamental and
long-range policies of the University
and make recommendations to the Leg-
islative Council based on the proposed
study." The report is to be presented
before Nov. 1, 1954.
  University  officials have said that
they welcome any opportunity to ex-
plain the operations of the University,
its problems, and the scope the UW
covers.
Property Purchase Limits
  Three bills prohibiting the Univer-
sity and other institutions of higher
learning from purchasing non-income
producing property for expansion or
other purposes were favorably received
by the Joint Finance Committee.
  Sponsored by the Legislative Coun-
cil, the bills result from the UW's prac-
tice of buying, through the University
Building  Corporation, buildings-for
f u t u r e expansion purposes-f r o m
which no revenues are derived to repay
the original loan.
  The measures: 1. Make purchase on
any  non-income    producing  property
dependent on Legislative approval; 2.
Require loans to be secured by mort-
gages on property producing sufficient
income to repay the mortgage at a
stated time; 3. Prohibit the UW from
using legislative appropriations to pay
rentals on buildings it got through the
Building Corporation.
  The latter bill was quickly approved
by the two houses and was signed by
the Governor.
Fees Increased
Budget Adjusting Is Underway
  How is the University going to live
with its budget for the next biennium,
if the Legislature provides no further
funds ? UW officals say that the budget
will call for a reduction from the pres-
ent expenditure level of something over
a million dollars each year, at least.
  Last month the Regents gave in-
formal approval of principles under
which the present budget could be cut.
Regents Welcome Gifts, Grants
  More than half a million dollars in gifts and grants were accepted
by the Regents last month. Gifts totaled $68,023.01 and grants
amounted to $489,724.
  The increasing amounts in both categories reveal the University's
reputation as a research center-as well as a recognition of the need
for financial help to outstanding students, both undergraduate and
graduate. Here is a list of the donors, and the amounts they provided:
               Gifts
General Foods Corp .-------- $ 2,500
Procter and Gamble Co .------- 5,900
Wisconsin Eastern Alumni
  Scholarship Fund ----------   600
G e n e r a I Electric Educational
  Fund ---------------------3,300
Harnischfeger Corp. --A rectifier welder
Standard Oil Foundation        2,500
American Cynamid Co. -         1,800
Allied Chemical and Dye Corp.  2,000
Medical School Wives             25
Green Tree Garden Club, Mil-
  waukee -------------------   1,000
Abbott Laboratories ----------- 1,500
Laird H. Simons Jr. -----------1,000
A. 0. Smith Corp. - Welding equipment
Robert Sheriffs Moss ---------   25
L. C. Forman & Sons, Onalaska
  Pickle and Canning Co.,
  Clyde Kraut Co., Seneca
  Kraut and Pickling Co., Stein-
  feld's Products Co. ----------225
Engineering faculty and friends
  of Dean Withey - Portrait of the dean
1953 Short Course Class          55
Alexander and Margaret Stewart
  Trust for cancer research   45,000
Walt Disney Productions          50
Madison Elks Club ----------    587
A. C. Nielsen Co.....A factual survey
                   on WHA listeners
American Cancer Society, Wis.
  Div. -----------------------  500
Alexander Grant and Co.         250
Dr. Harwin J. Brown --------     25
Dairy and food industries dept.
  staff and grad students       623
Wisconsin Heart Assn. -    Electronic
                          cardioscope
Milwaukee A s s n. Purchasing
  Agents------------------
Friends and relatives of the late
  Royal H. Kanies----------
              Grants
Abbott Laboratories
E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co.
Wisconsin Utilities Assn.
American Heart Assn .--------
The Upjohn Co.------------
American Cancer Society, Inc. _
Fort Dodge Laboratories, Inc. __
W. K. Kellogg Foundation ---
Ford Foundation Fund for the
  Advancement of Education --
National Science Foundation __
Shell Chemical Corp.
Institute of Life Insurance
King Edward, Bloch Bros.,
  Badger State and E. M. Bek-
  kedal tobacco companies, and
  Wis. Coop. Tobacco Growers
  Assn.--------------------
Rockefeller Foundation-
250
208
  2,000
  500
111,950
  4,200
  3,600
  68,724
  220
  5,980
186,000
16,000
  2,100
  9,500
  2,450
  76,000
Under the policy approved, University
teaching and research would be lowered
to the 1951-52 level, and non-academic
services cut 10 to 15 per cent below last
year's level. The money available for
these services will be $394,120 less
next year than was available back in
1951-52.
   In another action, the Regents de-
cided to go along with the suggestion
of the Legislature's Joint Finance Com-
mittee that tuition fees be increased, so
that further cutbacks in operation could
be avoided. The Regents, in fact, went
further than   suggested  in  adjusting
non-resident fees.
  The Regents approved fee increases
of $30 for the academic year for Wis-
consin residents. This would bring total
resident fees to $180, contrasted with
the present $150. aNon-resident tuition,
however, was set at $500 a year, $50
more than at present.
  The fee increases were opposed by
former Gov. Oscar Rennebohm, who
objected to changing "a fundamental
principle of higher education in Wis-
consin.
  The Regents also decided to raise
Summer Session fees from $60 to $70,
along with all per-credit and special
fees.
  Readjustment to the new budget was
made more difficult, UW officials said,
because the legislative estimate of fee
income resulting from a $30 per year
increase was h i g h. The legislators
didn't take into consideration the nor-
mal drop-off of students the second
semester and the fee-remission scholar-
ships.
  Study indicates, too, that not more
than $20,000 to $30,000 can be raised
by hiking charges for adult education.
The Legislature had estimated t ha t
$250,000 a year could be obtained in
this fashion. But the Regent policy calls
for "maximum fees w h i c h can be
charged without adverse effect on in
come or on educational programs."
                                    13
- MAY, 1953


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