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Baird, Jerome E. (ed.) / The Wisconsin engineer
Volume 47, Number 8 (May 1943)

Jacobson, Glenn; Tomlinson, Charles
Alumni notes,   pp. 30-36 ff.


Page 33


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MAMMOTH ingots of steel for war
weapons must be "cropped" or
trimmed at the ends before forging.
Formerly- this job was done slowly and
laboriously on a heavy press, but today
the huge ingots are sliced neatly and
quickly by the oxyacetylene flame.
  Using a new heavy cutting technique
developed by Airco Research Engineers
and cutting through metal as thick as
36", the oxyacetylene flame trims off
both ends of this ingot at once in ap-
proximately 11 minutes, compared to
several hours required by other methods.
The new ingot cutting machine designed
and built by Airco engineers especially
for this job guides the movement of the
oxyacetylene cutting torches in an arc
corresponding to the ingot contour.
  This new flame cutting application
typifies the ever-expanding usefulness
of the oxyacetylene flame in American
industry. Spurred by the need for
swifter war production, industries are
finding more and more ways to acceler-
ate manufacturing with oxyacetylene
flame and electric arc processes.
  If you want to keep posted on some
of the most recent developments and
applications of oxyacetylene flame and
electric arc processes, write for a free
copy of the illustrated booklet, "Airco
in the News." Please address your re-
quests to Air Reduction, Room 1656,
60 East 42nd Street, New York.
(51
AIR
REDUCTON
60 EAST 42nd STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y.
       In Texas:
 Magnolia-Airco Gas Products Co.
 General Oftices: HOUSTON, TEXAS
OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES
ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING FOR GAS WELDING OR CUJTTING AND ARC WELDING
I
M A Y, 19 4 3
33
I


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