University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The University of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Cassell, Frank A.; Klotsche, J. Martin; Olson, Frederick / The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: a historical profile, 1885-1992
(1992)

Chapter three: a major university for Milwaukee: 1962-1971,   pp. [49]-[68]


Page [64]-[65]

grace and tradition to the UJWM campus. In 1963 an apartment building on
the northeast comer 
of Downer and Kenwood Avenues was purchased. Now called Purin Hall, it serves
as a graduate 
student dormitory. 
THE BUILDING BOOM, 1964-71 
Besides purchasing adjacent land and buildings, UWM embarked on its own massive
building 
program between 1964 and 1971. Nearly $21 million was spent on five major
projects. In order of 
completion, they were Bo[ton Hall (1964), Physics Building (1966), Library,
Phase 1(1967), and the 
Engineering and Mathematical Sciences Building (1971). In addition, a "temporary"
building 
costing nearly $500,000 was put up in 1970 for use by the Psychology Department.
More than 20 
years later, it is still in use. Even as these buildings opened to students,
others were being 
constructed or had been authorized. Enderis Hall, the Nursing Building, phase
II of the library, an 
expansion of the student union, and the three towers of Carl Sandburg Hall-a
dormitory 
FROa 1957 THROUGH 1968, 
SPRING COMMENCEMENT 
CEREMONIES WVERE HELD IN 
PFARsF FIELD. DURING THAT 
PERIOD THE WVINTER 
COMMENCE MENTS WERE HELD 
IN THE UNION. 
complex-were all in process. By the time Chancellor Klotsche retired in 1975,
over $100 million 
had been spent or committed for land acquisition, building construction,
campus improvements, 
and the remodeling of existing facilities. Any student or faculty member
associated with UWM in 
these years remembers the disruptions and inconveniences caused by the construction.
The 
process of building UWM seemed endless and once caused the Milwaukee Journal
to comment that 
"the cement never sets on Klotsche's empire." 
Besides development on the L-shaped Kenwood Campus, UWM obtained properties
that were 
not contiguous to the university. These included three East Side mansions
originally owned by 
Joseph Uihlein, Sr., John Pritzlaff, and Walter Hamischfeger. All were donated
to UWM, and the 
Hamischfeger home on Lake Drive in Shorewood has since served as the chancellor's
residence. 
The other structures were subsequently sold by UWM. The university also acquired
a 177-acre 
tract in Ozaukee County adjacent to the Cedarburg Bog. It had originally
been purchased by the 


Go up to Top of Page