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Murphy, Thomas H. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Volume 83, Number 1 (Nov. 1981)

Wineke, William R.
Religion is "in" on campus,   pp. 19-27


Page 21


   Mr. Vinson: Yes, I think parents should
try to discourage any tunnel vision their
children have about a career. The person
who comes here and says, "I want to be a
nurse, and only a nurse," may not even
know what, say, anthropology is. But after
he or she is here a few weeks and hears
more about it, the reaction is, "Hey, an-
thropology-or nutrition or whatever-
looks even better than nursing." Much of
this could be avoided by a careful study of
the catalogs while the student is back in
high school.
   Mr. Kellesvig: And there may be more
involved than mere inconvenience. Almost
any new freshman can go into the pre-
professional portion of our programs but,
with resource limitations, getting into the
professional school may be another story. It
isn't that they're not good students, they're
just not good enough. When they're turned
down, they don't know where to go. But if
they've kept a few options open and pre-
pared for an alternative major or two, they
might be okay.
   Mr. Vinson: One option is to leave for a
while, and it's a good option for a lot of peo-
ple. It's become rather common: they did a
study here in 1978 and it showed that grades
were appreciably higher with people who'd
"stopped out" for at least two semesters
than they'd been for them the first time
around. I think the process is of particular
value to someone who's becoming disen-
chanted with his or her field of study. It's a
good way to think about things and gain a
new perspective.
   Wisconsin Alumnus: You've talked to a
relatively small circle, the student, the fam-
ily, the high school. Is there a broader audi-
ence, too, whom you'd like to reach?
   Mr. Bosworth: Yes. I read an anecdote
the other day in which the schoolboard
member and the district superintendent
were discussing the serious need to cut costs
by restructuring the curriculum. So what is
kept in is band; what is kept in is football.
What is axed is foreign language and
fourth-year math. This happens!
   Mr. Kellesvig: You can remember the
flap in Rockford a few years ago when they
cut out their athletic program. Would that
same hue-and-cry go up if they'd cut out lab
science or trig? I know that in some places it
certainly wouldn't!
   Mr. Bosworth: If we want our kids edu-
cated, we can't not support public and pri-
vate education, and we can't be apathetic
about what is dropped if something has to
be dropped. Too often-particularly in
small communities-valuable programs are
not offered because the public won't give
them the resources. Then they can't under-
stand why their kids can't get into the better
colleges and universities. Every community
has to be responsible for keeping its educa-
tional system running at its best potential.
   Mr. White: It's going to cost more and
more. We can make the analogy to heating
our homes. We've turned the thermostats
down about as far as they can go, but the
heating costs keep rising. We're just going
to have to pay out more to keep what we
have. Maybe schools today can't be trans-
portation agencies; maybe they can't be nu-
tritional agencies anymore. Maybe they
can't be recreational agencies anymore.
But they have to continue to educate.  El
Moving?
Name
Class Yr.
Old Address
New Address
City
State                  Zip
Effective Date
"Parents! Do You Know Where
Your Children Are??"
If UW mail for these young alumni is
coming to your home and has to be
forwarded, please give us their new
address(es)
Name (as student)
Class Yr.
New name (if applicable)
City
State                    Zip
Additional names, addresses:
Records Office
WAA
650 N. Lake St.
Madison 53706
Wisconsin Alumni Association
June30, 1981 Year-End
Financial Statement
RECEIPTS
AMOUNT
Annual Dues ...................... $159,838
Varsity/Contributions ................ 25,629
Life Dues .......................... 38,357
Withdrawal from Life Fund ........... 106,643
Insurance Gifts ................ ..... 34,409
Advertising .......................... 7,300
Program Registration ................. 62,608
Tours/Merchandise  .................. 50,128
O ther ................................ 954
TOTAL RECEIPTS ............... $485,866
EXPENSES
Wages & Staff-Related ............. $277,418
Printing &  Mailing .................. 130,458
General Overhead ................... 21,972
Program Related  .................... 39,792
Travel &  Promotion ................... 9,531
O ther ................................. 43
TOTAL EXPENSES ............... $479,214
Summary of Expenses by Program
PROGRAM
General Administration ............. $301,160
Volunteer Leadership ................. 5,036
Continuing Education ................ 9,561
Alumni Weekend .................... 19,511
Alumni Clubs ....................... 10,569
Student Relations ..................... 6,048
Member Benefits .................... 11,372
Recognition/Awards .................. 2,178
M agazine ........................... 53,297
Member Promotion/Renewal .......... 37,854
Other .............................. 22,628
TOTAL EXPENSES ............... $479,214
NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 1981 / 21
To Participants
in our Life Insurance
Program
The Wisconsin Alumni Association's
life insurance program earned a divi-
dend for the policy year ending May
31, 1981. If you were insured in the
program during this period, you may
be eligible for a federal tax deduction
equal to 26.5 percent of your annual
premium.
WAA is a not-for-profit 501(c) (3) or-
ganization eligible to receive tax-
deductible gifts. We suggest you con-
sult your tax adviser regarding your
individual case.
Address


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