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Murphy, Thomas H. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Vol. 70, Number 7 (May 1969)

Schultz, Charles F.
$75 a month, plus pride,   pp. [4]-9


Page 9


(LEFT):
ARTHUR EITH '67 HELPED THE
FEED MILL BEGIN OPERATIONS
IN MALAYSIA AND FORMU-
LATED ITS FIRST MIXTURES.
(BELOW) CAROL (GELHAUS)
AND TERRY PETERSON IN-
STRUCT ELEMENTARY TEACH-
ERS IN BRAZILIAN TROPICS.
HEAT AND     ILLNESS COST
TERRY 30-LBS. IN THEIR-FIRST
YEAR ON THE ASSIGNMENT.
   Eith bagged the first batch of the new feed last Janu-
ary, and it costs 15 to 20 per cent less than imported
feed. Now he's working on other mixtures.
A cross the Pacific, in Peru, Lynne Santangelo has
    gotten more out of Peace Corps than experience.
She found a husband, another Volunteer, and the two
now work side by side in El Augustino, one of the
more depressing hillside barriadas of Lima.
  The barriadas are slum neighborhoods that sur-
round the city, absorbing the families who pour into
the capital from rural areas, and Lynne is in an un-
usual program to make education mean something
to the children there.
  "The kids are in a transition stage into an urban
culture," Lynne says, and she is helping them through
by introducing audio-visual aids into the schools and
by bringing students out from the isolation of their
neighborhoods so that they can develop a feeling for
the city and the opportunities within it.
  She leads students to factories, hospitals, offices
and other places of potential employment, and also
to places they will need to be familiar with.
  "For instance, we go to one of the biggest banks in
town and the manager himself comes out to greet us
and lead us on a tour and explain what's going on.
For these kids, it's a mind-opening thing. One of their
fathers would never think of going into a bank. He
might stand out in front, hat in hand, and keep his
eyes down, but would never go in. Now these kids
have been addressed by the manager himself, and
when at some point in their lives they need to deal
with a bank, they'll go in there without fear."
Almost 3000 miles east of Lima, Terry and Carol
Peterson are working in Sao Luis de Quitunde,
Alagoas State, part of Brazil's desperately poor North-
east. Both Petersons have education degrees and are
helping elementary teachers prepare courses in health,
nutrition and hygiene in an area where a variety of
May, 1969
diseases are endemic, where infant mortality frequently
reaches 50 percent, and life expectancy is not much
more than 40 years. In addition to teacher seminars,
curriculum preparation and such, the Petersons also
teach English at night in the local junior high school,
and Terry is attempting to introduce rabbit raising into
the areas as a cheap source of protein.
   But individual Volunteers are not the only links be-
tween the University of Wisconsin and the Peace
Corps. President Fred H. Harrington and Joseph Kauff-
man, former dean of students and now president of
Rhode Island college, are members of the Peace
Corps National Advisory Council. A hefty number of
faculty members have served as Peace Corps staffers
in Washington and a    two were overseas country
directors), and another substantial lot have participated
in the more than 40 training programs held on one
or another of the University's campuses.
  The bloom has long been on the Peace Corps rose
at Wisconsin, but how long it stays is hard to say.
Nowadays the mere fact of its existence is enough
to brand Peace Corps as "Establishment" in the minds
of some students. There are powerful tugs by com-
peting Volunteer programs which operate in domestic
problem areas. There is, too, the local share of na-
tionwide student unrest and reactions to it that could
affect future Peace Corps generations. The regents'
recent tightening of restrictions on out-of-state un-
dergraduate enrollment, for example, could serve in
the long term to reduce the numbers of those more
active students who have historically been the major
source of Peace Corps Volunteers.
  But thus far, the majority of Wisconsin students
still look on Peace Corps as a satisfying means of in-
volvement. Vincent O'Hearn, Peace Corps representa-
tive at Madison, reports that "as far as we can tell,
the recent unrest and ferment have not hurt recruit-
ing." The figures appear to bear him out: in the cur-
rent recruiting year that began last September, 173
Badgers have applied for Peace Corps service. 0
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