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Richard, George (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Volume 54, Number 3 (Nov. 1952)

Lentz, Art
On Wisconsin in sports,   pp. 18-19


Page 18


Basketball Prospects Are Improved
NEVER THE ONE to discount his
      prospects, University of Wiscon-
      sin varsity basketball coach Bud
Foster views the coming 1952-53 sea-
son with optimism that is refreshingly
frank and forthright.
  He believes the Wisconsin team will
do a better job than last year and pre-
dicts a rise in Big Ten ratings. Last
year the Badgers won only five out of
the 14 Big Ten games and finished 7th
in the standings.
  The Badger mentor, now entering
his 19th season as boss-man of basket-
ball, offers this cheerful outlook for
better times despite the loss of All-
Conference Guard Ab Nicholas and five
other major lettermen.
   "We ought to move in the standings
mainly because we will have more bal-
ance," Bud states. "The loss of Nich-
olas, one of the top scorers in school
history, naturally is a serious one but
this year all five starters will be able
to share the responsibilities on the court,
rather than looking to Nicholas to
carry the burden as was the case during
the biggest portion of the season last
year."
   Actually, the accent will be on youth
at Wisconsin this season. Only two
seniors are on the squad, Tom Ward
of Wauwatosa, and Charles Siefert, for-
merly of Black River Falls and now of
Madison. Both are guards with plenty
of experience.
   Meanwhile, there are a number of
 sophomores and juniors available who
 gained valuable experience either on
 junior varsity or varsity teams.
   Foster, however, does temper his op-
 timism somewhat by pointing out that
 the Badgers are still a year or two away
 from being serious title contenders.
 Small as most college squads go, the
 lack of overall height this year may
 hurt Wisconsin.
 18
  Wisconsin not only lost Nicholas,
who was fifth in Big Ten scoring last
year with a 16.8 point average. Gradu-
ation took three other major letter win-
ning forwards, Pete Anderson, Ed Car-
penter, and Carl Herried, and a good
forward-guard reserve in Si Johnson,
also a major letterman. On top of that,
Chuck Dahlke, twice a major letterman
as a center, ended his competition.
  Wisconsin will have three starters
back from last year, all of whom played
an important part in the upset of Iowa
and Illinois, the Big Ten leaders, at the
dose of the campaign. They aLre Siefert,
guard; Paul Morrow, towering center
of St. Croix Falls, and Dick Cable, Ste-
vens Point, a lithe forward. Morrow,
as a sophomore last year, finished run-
nerup to Nicholas in scoring with 275
points and also was 14th in Big Ten
scoring with 165 points. Cable was
third high in Badger scoring with 136
        THE SCHEDULE
           BASKETBALL
IVec. 5-Marquette at Madison
      8-Loyola at New Orleans
      15-Iowa at Madison
      20-Purdue at Lafayette
      26--California at Madison
      27-Oregon at Iowa City
      29-Iowa at Iowa City
Jan.  3-Purdue at Madison
      5-Minnesota at Minneapolis
      10-Illinois at Champaign
      12-Minnesota at Madison
      17-Northwestern at Evanston
      19-Ohio St..at Madison
Feb. 7-illinois at Madison
      9-Indiana at Bloomington
      14-Michigan at Madison
      16-Indiana at Madison
      21-Michigan at Ann Arbor
      23-Michigan St. at East Lansing
      28-Ohio State at Columbus
Mar. 7-Northwestern at Madison
       9-Michigan St. at Madison
-1
IIN SPORTS * By Art Lentz
I                                                                       
                                                      I
points while Siefert came along fast in
the closing games to score 89 points.
  Cable competed as a freshman last
year and broke two school records for
field goal shooting percentages with a
mark of .391 for all games and had a
splendid .368 mark in the Big Ten rat-
ings.
  Three other major lettermen are on
hand. They are Tony Stracka, Hartford,
and Ronnie Weisner, Elgin, Ill., for-
wards; and Ward, a guard of two years
experience.
  Tallest man is Morrow at 6-7. Cable
is 6-2, Siefert is 6-1, Ward is 6-0,
Stracka is 6-3, while Wiesner is 5-8.
  A number of junior "W" men are
also on hand. They include Bob Weber
of Lodi (6-5 ½) center or guard; Mike
Daly, Wi s c o n s i n Rapids, forward;
Roger Godfrey, Wauwatosa, guard;
Owen J. Roberts,. Madison, forward;
Alan Hinnrichs, Milwaukee (6-4) cen-
ter; David Massey, Glencoe, Ill. for-
ward; Dan Spika, La Crosse, guard;
and Bob Turner, Belvidere, Ill., guard.
   Among s o m e promising numeral
winners of last year are Dan Folz, Mil-
waukee, center (6-6) and Matt Put-
zier, Ellsworth, guard.
   Foster believes the move by the
Western Conference from a 14-game to
an 18-game schedule is more equitable
and removes the possibility of a team
receiving a schedule "break." Under
this new system of double round-robin
play, each team plays a home-and home
schedule with all of the other confer-
ence schools.
   Wisconsin opens its schedule against
Marquette in the fieldhouse on Friday
night, Dec. 5, then travels to New
Orleans for a tussle with Loyola of the
South on Dec. 8.
   THERE STILL are post-game argu-
 ments on George O'Brien's 96 yard
 punt against Iowa this season. But rest
 assured it is officially the best in foot-
 ball despite claims to the contrary.
            WISCONSIN ALUMNUS
I


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