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McCormick, Bart E. (ed.) / The Wisconsin alumni magazine
Volume 28, Number 2 (Dec. 1926)

Campus notes and faculty news,   p. 60


Page 60


6December, 1926
Campus Notes and Faculty News
  MEMBERS of governing boards-of state
universities and allied institutions met
in annual convention in Madison on
-Nov. I I 12, and 13, to discuss problems
peculiar to these institutions.
  FIVE candidates for the Wisconsin
Rhodes scholarship to be awarded this
year are J. A. Behnke, Appleton; Jef-
ferson Burrus, Stoughton; Clifford Fran-.
seen, Frederic; Lowell Frautschi, Madi-
son; and George Johnson, Kenosha.
   ONLY one private residence is left on
 the lake shore side of Langdon St., that
 of J. H. Palmer at ,I26 Langdon. Fra-
 ternities and sororities have bought all
 the other houses, making that street in-
 deed "Fraternity Row."
   ONE intercollegiate debate by women
 students representing the universities of
 Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Iowa, is "on
 the forensic program which opens No-
 vember 3o with the freshman declama-
 tory contest..
   A SERIES of afternoon programs for
 students has been -arranged by the fac-
 ulty committee on lectures and convoca-_
 tions,- This will. enable students who
 enjoy good music, drama and poetry to
 come into contact with those who are
 qualified to offer them these things.
 Faculty members having various talents
 have been asked to contribute to the
 programs.
   INTEREST in the study of the pipe or-
 gan at the University has made neces-
 sary'the establishment of a waiting list,
 addition of a student assistant instruc-
 tor, and ordering of a new two-manual
 Estey practice organ.
   A NEW course to train teachers of
 dancing, in connection with physical
 education work, to be conducted by the
 department of physical education for
 women was approved recently by the
 faculty.
    AMONG the 15oo fathers who visited
  their sons and daughters for the Annual
  Father's Day at the University was Mr.
  Richard Williamson, who came all the
  way from Mexico City, Mexico, to visit
  his son Richard. Perhaps Mr. Caldwell
  of Rio, Wis., takes the prize for having
  the largest number of children in one
  family in the University. Donald and
  Byron, Bernice and Mabel Caldwell are
  all enrolled as Freshmen.
    EDITORS and business managers of
  Wisconsin high school publications at-
  tended a state convention held in Madi-
  son Nov. 26-27 under the auspices of the
  Course in Journalism.
    SIGMA DELTA CHI, national profes-
  sional journalism fraternity, met in
  Madison Nov. i5, 16, and 17. Kent
  Cooper, general manager of the Asso-
  ciated Press, President Glenn Frank,
  and Prof. W. G. Bleyer were some of the
speakers on the program. The Wiscon-
sin -chapter of Sigma Delta Chi was
founded in I9 I, two years afterthe first
chapter was founded at De Pauw uni-
versity.
  A SPECIAL weekly edition of the Daily
Cardinal, con tainingi a digest of news
of interest to parents, of students and
friends of the University, made its first
appearance at the Father's Day banquet
on-October 30. e Thweekly editin, is
edited and published'by the regular staff
of the CardinaL.
  MORE' advanced -degrees in agricul-"
ture are granted by the University than
by - any similar insttution in America.
It exceeds its nearest competitor by
-about 8o for the threetyear period, i1922-
25. Plant pathology, bacteriology, agri-
cultural -economics,,, and agricultural
chemistry iwere among the most popular
departments for graduate instruction in
agriculture.:
   TWENTY Of the 21, junior students in
 the College of Engineering at the Uni-
 versity who have been awarded sopho-
 more high honors and honors come'from
 'Wisconsin homes.
 SSix con-certs which will be held at the
 University under the auspices of the
 Union Board include. the Ukrainian Na-
 tional chorus, Louis Graveure, Pablo
 Casalsý and Harold Bauer, Sergei Rach-
 maninoff, Fritz Kreisler, and Sigrid
 Onegin.
   A FUND of $I5oo establishing a fel-
 lowship in chemical engineering for pulp
 and paper research has been accepted
 by the Regents from the Northwest Pa-
 per Co. of Cloquet, Minn. George Bra-
 bender, Peshtigo, '25, is conducting the
 work under the direction of Prof. O. L.
 Kowalke of the department of chemical
 engineering.
   THREE short courses were offered in
 September at the United States Forest
 Products Laboratory, Madison. Men
 from many different industries and all
 sections of the United States were en-
 rolled.
   PLANS for the new Service Memorial
 Institute, the first of the group of new
 medical buildings recommended by
 Dean Charles R. Bardeen, have been
 approved by the Board of Regents.
    Prof. LESLIE F. VAN HAGAN presided
  at the annual convention of Engineering
  College Magazines Associated, which
  met in Minneapolis October 22 and 23.
    Members of the University faculty
  took an active part in the Wisconsin
  State Teachers' Association held, in Mil-
  waukee during   November.    Among
  those who appeared on programs were
  H. M. WILLING, ABBY L. MARLATT,
  Dean G. C. SELLERY, ARNOLD DREIDEN,
  C. J. ANDERSON, IRA C. DAVIS, A. T.
WEAVER,- R. oW. WEST, E. J. KRAUSS,
LOWELL E. NOLAND, Dr. J. H. MATH-
EWS, FRANK L. CLAPP, EDGAR B. GOR-
DON, and. SUSAN B. DAVIS.
  Dr. CHARLEs HOMER HASKINS, of
Harvard, whom some of the older alumni
will remember as pr6fessor of history at
Wisconsin, was honored at the opening
ceremonies of the Sorbonne, Paris, on
November 6, by having bestowed* upon
him the degree of doctor honoris causa.
He has also been honored by the univer-
.sities of Wisconsin, Strasburg, Padua
and Manchester. He was-Chief of the
Division of Western Europe on the
American   Commission   to  Negotiate
Peace in !9i8 and, i9.i9, and besides
being a member of many lea-rned socie-
ties, has written extensively on historical
and political subjects.-
   Dr. JOSEPH G. SCHAEFER, superin-
 tendent of the Wisconsin Histoiical So-
 ciety, has the distinction of being the
 author of the first'book to be published
 by the University of Oregon Press which
 was established this year under the di-
 rection of Dean EricoW. Allen, 'oi, of the
 College of Journalism, University .of
 Oregon. Dr. Schaefer's book, a biogra-
 phy of the late Lucian Prince Campbell,
 of the University of Oregon, was first
 distributed at the ceremonies incident
 to the celebration of the university's
 semi-centennial and the inauguration of
 Dr. Arnold Bennett Hall, Dr. Schaefer
 and Professor Paxson, of the history de-
 partment of the University, were both
 present at the inauguration of President
 Hall.
   Prof. J. B. KOMMERS,. 'o6, associate
 professor of mechanics, has had requests
 for his bulletin "Comparative Tests of
 Button Head and Countersunk Riveted
 Joints" from many sources, including
 leading engineers in this country and
 Europe and professors of engineering in
 leading universities in the world.
   Prof. C. K. LEITH of the department
 of geology spent a week during October
 in an inspection trip over the iron ranges
 of Minnesota and Michigan with eastern
 officials of Bethlehem, Youngstown and
 other steel companies.   Immediately
 preceding this trip he delivered the ad-
 dress at the dedication of Samuel Ma-
 ther Science Hall, presented by Mr. H.
 G. Dalton, Cleveland, 0., to Kenyon
 College. Professor Leith was given an
 LL.D. on this occasion.
    Prof. L. F. GRABER delivered an ad-
  dress in September on "Opportunities
  for Rural Leadership" at the Universi-
  ties of Vermont and New Hampshire
  before the Farmers and Home Makers
  Conference.
6*0


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