University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The University of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Lochner, Louis P. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumni magazine
Volume 12, Number 3 (Dec. 1910)

Richardson, W. D.
The 1911 football season,   pp. 118-120


Page 120


THE WISCONSIN ALUMNI MAGAZINE
the scientific appliances and the
knowledge of the whole faculty
to get the cow on terra firma
again.
  While thee universrtty of today
affords far greater facilities for
acquiring an education than in
the 50's, yet the students then
had a royal good time. No more
gentlemanly, kind hearted teach-
er could be found than Chancel-
lor Lathrop. It was both pleas-
ant and profitable to meet in the
class  room   such  noble, high
minded   professors as Sterling,
Conover, Butler, Read and Kur-
steiner. When the student met
the professor on the campus or
elsewhere, he was called by his
name, received a warm, hearty
greeting, and was made to feel
that his teacher had a deep and
abiding interest in his welfare.
  At the commencement exercises
in 1859, the students had a great
opportunity of listening to an ad-
dress from Carl Schurz. It is not
needful to say that the address
was able, eloquent and full of
good thoughts.
THE 1911 FOOTBALL SEASON
          By W. D. RICHARDSON, '11
CE   the  installment
)r the November num-
er was written, the
adgers have- wound
p their 1910 football
ason with a brilliant
          10 to 0 victory over
Coach Stagg's Maroons, our oldest
rivals, thus making the season a
success despite the dismal showing
in the four previous games. Wis-
consin has justified herself in the
eyes of the Western intercollegiate
world and we may now safely pre-
dict better things in store for the
Cardinal.
  Before the Chicago game, Coach
Barry's team had two other en-
counters - one with Northwestern
at Camp Randall resulting in a
6 to 6 score, and the other with
Minnesota, the final verdict being
28 to 0. The Northwestern game
was a poorly-played contest. The
Badgers worked hard but there
was lack of team work. The Pur-
ple's previous drubbing by Chi-
cago, 10 to 0, made things look a
little shaky for Wisconsin.
  Then came two weeks' prepara-
tion for the Gophers. Coach Barry
could not possibly have had any
hope of beating Minnesota this
year. It could not have been done
except on the biggest kind of a
fluke. The team was drilled, how-
ever, hard and conscientiously in
defense and the results were in-
deed gratifying. Going into the
game with all odds against them,
the Badgers, following a brief as-
cension in the first quarter, played
118


Go up to Top of Page