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Niles, Donald E. (ed.) / The Wisconsin engineer
Volume 48, Number 7 (March 1944)

Graham, Walt
Mathematical morsels,   pp. 12-21


Page 16


zl t~          cAmMk   6
THE TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE, the ingenuitv and the resources
of America are at the disposal of our skilled medical officers on
the fighting fronts of the world. They command every aid the
nation can supply. That is one reason why a wounded man's
chances of survival are greater today than they have been in
any other war.
  Among the materials that are helping medical men in their
fight to save lives are the stainless steels. Used in operating
tables, surgical instruments and in other medical equipment,
stainless steels are serving in hospitals in this country and
overseas.
  Frequent sterilization with high temperature steam or strong
disinfectants will not injure stainless steels. Their smooth, hard
surface is easily kept free from germs that can cause fatal infec-
tion. Even in the damp trollics, stainless steels do not rust.
Tough and durable, free from the possibility of chipping,
stainless steels can withstand the rigors of wartime use.
  On the home front, too, stainless steels are making their
contriblution to the lhcalth of the nation. Because they are easier
to clean and keep clean than other metals, they are widely
used in equipment necessary to the processing, preparing and
serving of foods. They keep their bright finish, impart no flavor
to food, and resist food chemicals. They will be used increas-
ingly in restaurants, in the home, and in many industries where
their unique properties are so desirable.
  Stainless steels are "stainless" because they contain more
than 12 per cent chromium. Low-carbon ferrochronmiutn, a re-
search development of ELECTRO MIETALLURGICAL COMPANY,
a Unit of 17CC, is the essential ingredient in the large-scale
prodluction of stainless steel. Lnits of l CC do not slake steel
of any kind. They do make available to steelmakers many
alloys which, like ferrochromium, improve the quality of steel.
The basic research of these Units means useful newa metal-
lurgical information-and better metals to supply the needs
and improve the welfare of mankind.
Members of the rnedical profession, architects and designers are
invited to send for booklet P-3, "THE USE OF STAINLESS STEELS
IN HOSPITALS." There is no obligation.
CARBON FOR HEALTH. Research by           GASES FOR HEALTH. LINDE oxygen
a UCC Unit has resulted in differentt    U.S.P. made by a Unit of LCC is
used
forms of carbon used in milk irradiators,  by the sick in hospitals and at
hos--
"sun" lamps, gas masks-.amd ill air con-  and it contributes to
the safety of our
ditioning installations.        high flying aviators.
CHEMICALS FOR HEALTH. Synthetic          PLASTICS FOR HEALTH. BAKELITE
organic chemicals, deseloped by a Unit   and VINYLITE plastics, pesdst d
by
of UCC, mean better anesthetics, more    UCC Units, nsea  sanitary paint"s
floor
plentiful sulfa drugs, vitamins and other  coverings, shecting, "buns
sleeves  o and
pharmaceuticals.                other essentials.
BUY UNITED STATES WAR BONDS AND STAMPS
UNION CARBIDE AND CARBON CORPORATION
                              30 East 42nd Street ER3 New York 17, N. Y.
                           Principal Units in the United States and their
Products
ND METALS            CHEMICALS                           INDUSTRIAL GASES
AND CARBIDE     PLASTICS
allurgical Company   Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corporation  The Linde-
Air Products Company  1,akelit. Corporation
Hlie Company         ELECTRODES, CARBONS AND BATTERIES   The! O.xwid Railroad
Service Copany  Plastics Division of Car
es. Vanadium Corporation  National Carbon Company, Inc.  The Prest-O-Lite
Company, Inc.     Carbon Chemicals C
ALLOYS Al
Electro Met
laynes Stel
United Stat,
bide and
Corporation


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