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Murphy, Thomas H. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Volume 86, Number 2 (Jan. 1985)

Mucks, Arlie M., Jr.
On Wisconsin,   p. 5


Page 5


On
Wisconsin
n page 18 of this issue you'll read
          about the highly successful "Wis-
          consin Calling" project spon-
 sored by the UW Foundation, an undertak-
 ing which, like so many others, relies on
 bright young students to devote their time
 and energies on its behalf. We think of a
 teaching institution as something which
 gives to the student, and that is correct, of
 course. But there is another side to it; I
 think that perhaps an education is not truly
 completed until it teaches the student to
 give, too. Certainly that is the case here,
 and hundreds take advantage of it every
 year.
    According to the Dean of Students'
 office, there are some 588 registered stu-
 dent organizations on campus this year.
 Some, of course, require more from their
 members than do others. But I would ven-
 ture to say that not a one would function as
 well as it does without a core of young men
 and women who see it as an opportunity to
 serve their fellow students and their Uni-
 versity.
   There is still Humorology and Ski for
 Cancer, which raise money to fight that dis-
 ease, and there is Youngblood-the donor
 center. And there are groups who raise
 money for various charities; organizations
 that bring a more rounded experience to
 those in particular majors; honor societies,
 fraternal societies, social organizations.
 You know the vast range from your own ex-
 perience here, and you'll remember how
 effective were those which drew dedicated
 people both as leaders and as members.
   It has been our pleasure for many years
to be involved with some of the finest stu-
dents on campus. Probably the most visible
have been the Wisconsin Singers which we
have sponsored since their beginnings in
1968 and who have lived up to their title as
"Ambassadors of Song" before thousands
of you in alumni clubs throughout the coun-
try.
   Then, in 1980 we formed our Wisconsin
Alumni Student Board, bringing outstand-
ing students under the umbrella of
"alumni" before they actually graduated,
showing them the many ways in which we
serve our members and our University,
breaking them in, so to speak, so that they
have been able to step into higher roles in
alumni work after they begin their careers.
Each year the WASB holds a special recep-
tion for the officers of the major student or-
ganizations on campus, forming a liaison
with the University administration, getting
to know each other better for increased co-
operation in their student activities. It
sponsors the annual Seminar on Survival,
at which people in business talk to seniors
about career opportunities. On the lighter
side, the WASB sponsors the exam-time
Survival Kits, through which parents order
a bag of snacks for their offspring in the
dorms to tide them through the long hours
of study. It works with the Office of New
Student Services in conducting weekend
tours of the campus for prospective stu-
dents and their parents.
   In addition to our Student Board, WAA
has a Student Relations Committee made
up of alumni, faculty and students repre-
senting not only WAA but Pan Hel and
IFC, the Wisconsin Union Directorate and
the Wisconsin Student Association, to keep
open communication between such groups
and the University administration.
   Each fall the Homecoming Committee
is in and out of our offices, rather frantically
as that day draws near, as we advise its
members in coordinating displays, recep-
tions, the big parade, the publicity.
   And on and on, our doors opening and
closing; a small back room in our building
jammed with young people discussing some
pressing business of their particular group.
They're great to have around with their
boundless enthusiasm and optimism, and
we on the staff can't help but be inspired by
them. We've already learned from experi-
ence that those who assumed leadership
roles as students are the same people who
become the alumni who never lose touch
with their University. They continue their
concern and their support, depended on by
all of us who love this alma mater.
JANUARY/FEBRUARY 1985 / 5
By Arlie M. Mucks, Jr. '43
Executive Director


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