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Murphy, Thomas H. (ed.) / Wisconsin alumnus
Volume 84, Number 6 (Sept. 1983)

Murphy, Tom
Badger bookshelf,   p. 14


Page 14


Badger Bookshelf
By Tom Murphy
General
The 100% Natural, Purely Organic,
Cholesterol-Free, Megavitamin,
Low-Carbohydrate Nutrition Hoax
Elizabeth M. Whelan PhD and FREDERICK
J. STARE '31, '33, '34
Atheneum; 304 pps.; $14.95
As an MD reviewer says on the jacket, here's a
book you'll never find in a health food store.
Stare has earned national attention over the years
for his battles with those he considers quacks,
particularly in the nutrition field. (He's an emeri-
tus and the founder of Harvard's Department of
Nutrition.) Here, as the title promises, he and his
co-author take on the prophets of the natural-is-
safer, no-preservatives, no-sucrose philosophies,
the vitamin dispensers, and the quick-loss-diet
purveyors such as Pritikin and Tarnower. But
they also have a few sharp words for your own
physician if he or she is worried about your cho-
lesterol level or sees a possible tie between diet
and cancer.
Wisconsin's Famous and Historic Trees
R. BRUCE ALLISON MS'82
and Elizabeth Durbin
Wisconsin Books; 119 pps.; paper $14.95
More than 100 of the state's VITs are here in this
beautiful book. The black-and-white photos are
handsome, the descriptions concise and chatty.
Campus trees, hanging trees, homeplace trees
are among the eight general categories.
Surviving Exercise
PROF. JUDY ALTER (Phy Ed & Dance)
Houghton-Mifflin; 109 pps.; $5.95
In our March 1981 issue we ran an interview with
Prof. Alter, "Rebel With a Cause." In it she told
why she's convinced that many of the exercises
we do can actually harm us, especially if we're
guided by a coach, a ballet teacher or Jane
Fonda. This is the book she was working on at the
time of the interview. In it she tells us again
what's wrong with back-arching, knee-locking,
toe-touching, etc., and how to do the right exer-
cises for strength and suppleness. Her writing is
clear, the line-drawings easy to grasp.
The Flavor of Wisconsin
HARVA HACHTEN
(Instructor, School of Journalism)
State Hist. Soc. of Wis.; 383 pps.; $14.95
What we have here, really, are two books. The
first 143 pages are a gastronomic history of the
state-the foods native to an area and how the pi-
oneers used them; what the settlers did to adapt
them; home remedies; old cookbooks, engaging
trivia. Then we get thirty-two pages of vintage
photographs appropriately focused on food. Af-
ter this come the 400 recipes Mrs. Hachten culled
from more than 1600 submitted. These aren't
gourmet foods; they're solid, simple dishes made
from what most people have in their kitchen.
(Well, there is Blood Bread, and you may not
have any cracklings handy unless you've ren-
dered lard lately, but by and large-.) These
appear to be the favorite foods of generations
of Wisconsinites as they saluted their origins.
Fiction
The Wars of Love
MARK SCHORER '29, '36
Second Chance Press; 172 pps.; $16.95
Second Chance Press deserves applause for
bringing back meritorious works that too many
of us missed their first time around. Certainly this
1954 Schorer novel deserves its second chance.
The story of three men and a woman from child-
hood, it is told by one of the men "as an exercise
of memory, and memory can betray us smilingly
as a treacherous friend." Schorer is masterful in
working the facts through the glass of memory as
lives take their surprising course. "Intricate" is
the word used in two of three jacket quotes, and
intricate this novel is and sad and logical.
Reference, Texts, Misc.
These books have not been reviewed; details on
content, price and page-count are as provided by
the publishers.
CAROLYN MATTERN MA'68 & '81, PHD'76:
Soldiers When They Go (State Hist. Soc. of Wisc.;
108 pps.; $7.95). A documented history of troops
stationed at Camp Randall during the Civil War;
Mattem's master's thesis.
PETER B. WILEY MA'67 and Robert Gott-
lieb: Empires in the Sun (Putnam: 310 pps.;
$15.95). The new centers of power for American
politics and economics are six: L.A., San Fran-
cisco, Denver, Phoenix, Salt Lake City and Las
Vegas.
RAYMOND       MARK     BERGER      MS'73,
PHD'76: Gay and Gray: The Older Homosexual
Man (U. of I11. Press). Case studies of more than
100 men in that category.
JOHN WALKER POWELL '26, PHD'32: The
Experimental College (Seven Locks Press; 172
pps.; cloth $11.95, paper $7.95). Alexander
Meikeljohn's writings about the college, edited
by Powell. There is also Alexander Meikeljohn:
Teacher of Freedom by Cynthia Stokes Brown
(Meikeljohn Civil Liberties Institute; 261 pps.;
cloth $13.95, paper $7.95). A collection of his
writings and a biographical study. Both books
were published in 1982, the fiftieth anniversary of
the closing of Meikeljohn's Experimental Col-
lege on campus.
BEATRICE SCHWARTZ LEVIN '47, '49:
John Hawk: White Man, Black Man, Indian Chief
(May Davenport Press). A biography about a
participant in the Seminole Wars.
THOMAS H. ROHLICH '71, '75, '79: A Tale of
Eleventh-Century Japan (Princeton U. Press; 256
pps.; $30). Rohlich's translation of an ancient
Japanese work.
GALE JOHNSON MS'39 and Karen Brooks:
Prospectsfor Soviet Agriculture in the 1980s (Indi-
ana U. Press; $17.50).
JOEN E. GREENWOOD '56, '57, Franklin
Fisher, John McGowan: Folded, Spindled, Muti-
lated: Economic Analysis and US v IBM (MIT
Press; 440 pps.; $25). After ten years of litigation,
the government dismissed its monopoly suit
against IBM as "without merit." The authors, all
of whom were involved in the case, disagree with
that finding.
ALLEN WOLL MA'75, PHD'75: A Functional
Past: The Uses of History in Nineteenth-Century
Chile. (LSU Press).
KENNETH P. JAMESON MA'69, PHD'70,
and Charles Wilber: An InquiryInto the Poverty of
Economics (U. of Notre Dame Press; 294 pps.;
cloth $12.95, paper $8.95). A re-examination of
the history of economics, an analysis of current
problems and a proposal for reform. The news
release promises attention by the NYT Review of
Books, Time and Newsweek.
LEE SOLTOW '48, '49, '52 and Edward
Stevens: The Rise of Literacy and the Common
School in the United States: A Socioeconomic
Analysis to 1870 (U. of Chicago Press; $20). The
first full-scale, national-level study of literacy
through the Civil War period.
KENNETH R. DAVIS '46, '47: Marketing Man-
agement (John Wiley & Sons; 778 pps.;
$23.95)The fourth edition of the basics including
research, sales forecasting, information systems
and buyer behavior.
CURTIS D. MAcDOUGALL PHD'33: Interpre-
tative Reporting (MacMillan; paper; no other in-
formation). We reviewed this eighth edition of
                            continued on page 24
14 / THE WISCONSIN ALUMNUS


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