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Wisconsin alumni magazine
Volume 13, Number 3 (Dec. 1911)

Trottman, James F.
Regent Trottman's reply to C. P. Cary,   pp. [118]-119


Page [118]


REGENT TROTTMAN'S REPLY TO C. P. CARY
    EDIToR's NoTi-On November 21, State Superintendent C. P. Cary in an open
letter to teachers
    and the general public charged that Wisconsin was in danger of becoming
a state governed by
    the university; that even the regents were growing timid in opposing
the university's wants.
    He specifically charged that news of the co-operation between the university
and several of the
    state commissions in the establishment of so-called working fellowships
was not given pub-
    licity, but was concealed. As a matter of fact, a detailed statement
of the proposed plan was
    sent out to the daily papers of the state on September 9, and another
report to the weekly
    papers on October 9.
president of the Board
)f Regents of the Uni-
Ć½rersity of Wisconsin, I
nm asked to give my
opinion on State Super-
ntendent Cary's state-
           ment, published on
November 21.
  Mr. Cary is, by virtue of his
office, a member of the university-
Board of Regents.
  As to the propriety or impropri-
ety of Superintendent Cary's pub-
licly criticising the work of the
regents or of the faculty, I shall
not presume to speak, so long as
he speaks only for himself; but I
am  satisfied that when he speaks,
as he did in his published, state-
ment, for the board as well as for
himself, he steps beyond the bounds
of propriety and commits a breach
of which a state superintendent
should not be guilty, and which
can only be explained by assuming
that Mr. Cary should be classed as
an enemy of the university. Per-
sonally, my relations with Mr. Cary
have   been   and   are , uniformly
friendly. With reference to the
university, however, I believe Mr.
Cary should be classed among her
enemies. By so classifying Mr.
Cary, we can the better judge of
the merits or demerits, the sincerity
or want of sincerity, of his state-
ments.
  Whatever may have been the at-
titude of former boards, I know the
present Board of Regents are not
hostile to, but invite constructive,
helpful criticism from the student
body, from the faculty, from the
alumni and generally from Wis-
consin citizens. "All facts of uni-
versity management, down to the
minutest   details, including   the
books of account and other records
of the university and the proceed-
ings of the board, are open       to
proper inspection at all reasonable
times.
  U[r. CGary's statement, "There is
naturally a growing timidity on the
part even of regents    *  *  *   in
opposing   the   university  wants,
etc.," is contrary to fact and Mr.
Cary should not have made it. Nor
should Mr. Cary, by implication,
have charged anyone or more mem-
bers of the Board with weakness
or timidity.
  I am satisfied that the members
of the board who regularly attend
the meetings (and some regents are
negligent in that respect, including


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