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Binning, Jack (ed.) / The Wisconsin engineer
Volume 58, Number 1 (October 1953)

[Contents] Wisconsin engineer,   pp. 4-8


Page 4


   HOW TO DESIGN
       FOR LOWER
 STRUCTURAL COSTS
 W      AITH today's accent on cost,
 V   there is a promising future for
 the designer who can simplify struc-
 tural designs to save steel and con-
 struction manhours. Such savings are
 being realized every day by the use
 of arc welding instead of riveting
 in the construction of all types of
 industrial plants, multi-story build-
 ings and bridges. By eliminating
 rivets and taking advantage of rigid
 framing and continuous beam con-
 struction, welded designs help to
 offset the rising costs in labor and
 materials.
 Shown below is a typical example
of how full structural continuity
achieved through arc welding effect-
ed savings of $22,000 in the con-
struction of an 87,000 square foot
process warehouse. Arc welding
actually has saved 1.68 pounds of
steel per square foot. At $0.15 per
pound for fabricated steel, the sav-
ing amounts to $22,000 over the
cost of steel alone had riveted design
been used.
  In spite of the rapid progress
made in the construction field by
the welding industry, new develop-
ments are taking place every day
which are of prime importance to
the structural engineering graduate.
Latest information on welded struc-
tural designs is available in hand-
books and bulletins simply by writ-
ing to The Lincoln Electric Com-
pany, Cleveland 17, Ohio.
Fig. 1. Process warehouse for the Hale-
Halsell Grocery Co., Tulsa, Oklahoma. Size
250' x 350' with 16' clear height. Contrac-
tor: Tulsa Rig and Reel and Manufacturing
Co. Consulting Engineer: David R. Graham
& Associates, Tulsa, Oklahoma.
THE LINCOLN ELECTRIC COMPANY
         CLEVELAND 17, OHIO
THE WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER
    OF ARC WELDING EQUIPMENT
4
74 S&W~ra 59"44m    N~*49dfe
'7k: 74h4 , 924 cmC
KURT F. WENDT
Dean, College of Engineering.
                   Photo courtesy University News Service
120-ton compressor stator section for the world's largest wind
tunnel being machined on a 40-foot vertical boring mill. The
ring is for one of five compressors being built for the Air Force's
new wind tunnel at Tullahoma, Tennessee. Holes in the ring
are sockets for variable-pitch stationary blades. The compressors
plus their 216,000-hp electric drive will comprise the world's
largest rotating machine.           Cut courtesy Westinghouse
....  9
*.. . 10
. . .  16
DEDICATION.
THE WISCONSIN ENGINEER BANQUET
SUMMER SURVEY CAMP  ......
   Richard White
SUMMER CAMP DIARY .......
   Elizabeth Jackson
COMMERCIAL OXYGEN .......
   Robert Sommerfeld
TRANSISTORS.
   Victor Muth
WELDING AWARDS  ........
SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS
   John DuBois
W.S.P.E.
ALUMNI NOTES .
   Richard White
ENGINE-EARS .
   Larry McCormick
STATIC.
. . .  17
.... 20
.... 31
. ... 58
.... . . . . . .   .  24
.... . . . . . .   .  26
.... . . . . . .   .  34
.... . . . . . .   .  48
.... . . . . . .   .  62
THE WISCONSIN ENGINEER


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