University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The University of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Furniss, Jon (ed.) / Wisconsin engineer
Volume 101, Number 2 (February 1997)

Storm, Sarah
The Valentine's guide to happiness for the engineering student,   pp. 6-7


Page 6


The Valentine's Guide to Happiness
for the Engineering Student
--   0
It's that time of year
again, when lovebirds
everywhere begin singing
their songs and people
gaze starry-eyed at their
sweethearts.
That's right, it's almost
Valentine's Day, the 14th
of February, the date
when St. Valentine was
beheaded and martyred
during the persecution of
the Christians in the 3rd
century. Historically, it is
reported that there were
two St. Valentine's; one
was a Roman priest and
IAUGHTY LITTLE CUPID*
MREAKING HEARTS FR PLAY,
WNT YOU 8RJNG A hEAgT TO ME
k eHIS LVES DA?-
the other a Bishop of Terni
in Italy. However, these two people may in fact have
been the same person. St. Valentine may have been
taken from Terni to Rome for the beheading, and
people along the way, due to the lack of communi-
cation, may have thought that there were two St.
Valentine's.
Although St. Valentine (one or both of them) was
beheaded on February 14th, the exchanging of Val-
entine cards and gifts is not due to St. Valentine or
his martyrdom. Rather, the tradition of sending Val-
entines relates to a medieval belief that the birds
begin to mate on February 14. As Chaucer put it in
Parlement of Foules, "For this was on seynt
Valentynes day whan every foul cometh ther to
chese his make."
Now for some interesting logic developed in the
14th century: Since the birds begin to mate on Feb-
ruary 14, people should exchange tokens of their
love on this day as well. This tradition has carried
on through the years, with paper valentines begin-
ning in the 16th century, and modern-day gifts in-
cluding chocolates, candy, balloons, stuffed bears,
and edible underwear.
The tradition of sending
Valentines relates to a
medieval belief that the birds
begin to mate on February 14
End of history lesson. So it's almost Valentine's Day
and you're a loveless engineering student search-
ing for that special someone. Or, maybe you already
have a sweetheart but want to add some spice to
your relationship. Or, maybe you couldn't care less
about a sweetheart but want to beat the winter blahs.
In any case, I've come up with some suggestions to
ponder during this season of love.
Try some of the following ideas and see if your Val-
entine happiness doesn't multiply exponentially.
Good luck and Happy Valentine's Day!
Author Bio: Sarah Storm is a hopelessly romantic
chemical engineer.
W ISCONSIN
~VENGINEER
6


Go up to Top of Page