University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The University of Wisconsin Collection

Page View

Niles, Donald E. (ed.) / The Wisconsin engineer
Volume 48, Number 3 (November 1943)

Hagen, Hobart I.
Agricutural [sic] engineering,   pp. 6-7


Page 6


A gricutural
          Engineering
                                                                 -Courtesy
John Deere Co.
Farmers will see plenty of this machine after the war when production can
be unrestrict-
ed. First commercially produced in 1936, about 1500 of these field forage
harvesters are
now on American farms.
They make haying a one-man job, with that man driving the tractor, and the
machine
doing its own pick-up, chopping, and loading.
The field harvester is a four-purpose machine, and with the right attachments
it can
handle dry hay from the windrow, standing green crops for grass silage, windrowed
straw
left by the combine, and standing corn for silage.
With all attachments and a crop blower the forage harvester can replace the
hay loader,
hay fork and barn hay equipment, ensilage cutter, and corn binder. It also
produces
chopped feed that can be stored in half the space whole hay would take.
THE WISCONSIN ENGINEER
6


Go up to Top of Page