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Feldman, Jim / The buildings of the University of Wisconsin
(1997)

Agricultural engineering,   pp. 108-109


Page 108

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Fig. 1. Agricul-
tural Engineering
from the south
east, a comer of
old agronomy
roof at left, c.
1930. [series 9/3
Agricultural
Engineering,jf-
31]
Built in 1905 to house the department of agricultural engineering, this building still
houses its original discipline, and has been the site of a number of significant devel-
opments in the field. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.
A rthur Peabody's first new buildings as the university's supervising architect were the old
agronomy building and the agricultural engineering building. The agricultural engineering
...uilding had been on the drawing board since around 1904 when the department was insti-
tuted. But the plans of Peabody's predecessor, J. T. W. Jennings (approved June 1, 1905), had not
been built. After Peabody's arrival in 1905, he developed new plans following the guidance of the
university's consulting planners, Laird and Cret. The two buildings went out for bid together and
local builder T. C. McCarthy was selected as contractor in May of 1905.1
Probably because of the great amount of work Mr. McCarthy had undertaken in addition to
the two agriculture buildings (e.g. the central heating plant) the construction of the agricultural
buildings lagged behind schedule. Both buildings were finished in the fall of 1907. Some of this delay
may have been due to the unfamiliar nature of the materials, these two buildings were the first on
campus to be built of reinforced concrete. It appears that the agronomy building was probably fin-
ished first.
The agricultural engineering building is two stories over a full height basement 50 X 150 feet
with the long axis running north and south at the comer of Henry Mall and Linden Drive. It has a
poured concrete foundation and floors, walls of the same dark reddish-brown paving brick used on


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