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Evans, Mildred (ed.) / Wisconsin literary magazine
Volume XVIII, Number 2 (November 1918)

Van Hise, Alice
Tuesday again,   pp. 46-48


Page 46


November, 1918
WISCONSIN LITERARY MAGAZINE
Tuesday
A     LSO sometimes the blind beateth and smiteth
A     and grieveth the child that leadeth him, and
shall repent the beating by doing away of the child."
-from  Bartholomew's "Properties of Things".
Characters
Peter, an old man, quite blind.
Mary, a young girl.
Scene
A rude bench stands in front of the window of a
little brown hut. An old man sits there with his cane
in his hand. He is blind; and seems to stare off into
the distance with his pitiful, expressionless eyes. He
seems to be listening, for his head is bent to one side
and his body is held stiffly.
Peter, (talking to himself): "It must be Tuesday.
I couldna made a mistake."  (He feels a board which
has a number of notches cut in it. He counts). "
four, five, six- and today makes seven. She comes
today sure-will she bring the asters?  I do like the
feel of them. Is that her?-I heered somethin!  (He
leans forward excitedly. Soon an awkward, rather
homely girl appears, walks up to the old man. She
hands him a bunch of flowers; enters the hut and goes
to work, moving back and forth before the window
from time to time).
Peter, (feeling the flowers with evident pleasure):
"You brought um and its a wonder; ye be always for-
gettin.' Not so many flowers this time."
Mary, (from inside the house); "Well, well, here
I be again. What'd ye do I'd like to know, if I didna
come over to clean the house for ye of a Tuesday?"
Peter: "Oh, I'd do all right. Ye ain't so much. I
get along all right the other days. You don't fix the
chest so good as me old Susan did. I could al'ays tell
just where everything was. She put the saw to the
right in the farthest corner; and the hammer next it to
the left and -"
Mary: "Well, didn't I scrub the chest out grand
last time? Sure, I spent an hour on it when I could'a
went with Mabel to the Parsonage. And they had
white cake and pink -"
Peter, (interrupting angrily): "But I tell ye, I
like a shade o' dust 'round. Feels kind a nat'ral and
friendly. And mind, ye did mix the chest around.
Ye put me saw to the left corner, and it belongs to the
right!"
Mary: "Well what of it!   Oh, Lord in Heaven,
if you didn't leave the pan of milk on the chair. The
cat's got at it sure. It's only half full. Land! (she
Again
bursts out laughing). The pan's awful big. I bet
the cat'll bust."
Peter: "I hate the cat. I hate, hate her! She
sneaks in as quiet and I can't never hear her. Some-
times I feel she's in the room; and I feel 'round and
all of a sudden when I get near, she bounces up and
away. Once I heerd her on the sill and I crep up on
her as soft, and I swatted her like that! (He chuckles
low and beats the air with his cane) Ye oughta heered
her howl!"
Mary: "Yer mean as a dog."
Peter: "Mean am I? Mean! Well why don't
ye keep that cat out!  It's your fault!  It's your
fault!  Keep the cat out, I tell ye. Ye don't do
nothin' right. Ye al'ays put me saw to the left corner
and it b'longs to the right-right-right-can't ye
understand? Susan al'ays put me saw to the right."
Mary: "Ye make me tired! I'm not here only
Tuesdays; and I don't get nothin' for it neither. And
if ye think I'm gonna hear ye talk like "
Peter, (rising): "Huh! Ye don't come over once
in a moon; and when ye do come, ye don't-do-
nothin'! Ye walk around and walk around, and ye
talk, and ye talk, and-"
Mary: (becoming furious) -"Ye make me sick.
I make yer bed, and I scrub yer nasty floor and I
gather up the hull week's garbage, and empties it out;
and ye never says thanks and ye al'ays grumble, grum-
ble, grumble; and just because I put yer saw-"
Peter (in a furor) "Come here, I tell ye! (As
she refuses to come near him, he turns to the window
and before she can move away, strikes her with his
cane. She screams with surprise and anger).
(Concluded on page 48)
The Wisconsin Literary Magazine
Published Monthly During the Academic Year. An-
nual Subscription, One Dollar. Entered as Second
Class Matter at the Post Office at Madison, Wis.
Publication Office, Room 121, University Hall.
Administration
MILDRED EVANS, Editor-in-Chief
KARL V. HOHLFELD, Business Manager
ADOLPH GEIGER, Circulation Manager
Circulation Staff
FLORENCE FINNERUD
RUTIT SUNDELL           HILDA MABLEY
KATHERINE FISHBURN
Advertising Staff
RACHEL COMMONS            IRENE HALEY
FLORENCE HANNA
46


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