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Meyer, Wallace (ed.) / The Wisconsin magazine
Volume XIII, Number 5 (February 1916)

Farrington, Joseph R.
The Japanese situation in Hawaii,   pp. Twenty-Twenty-four


Page Twenty


THE WISCONSIN MAGAZINE
THE JAPANESE SITUATION IN HAWAII
                     By Joseph R. Farrington
          HREATENING European
>w<       complications are of but
           secondary importance in
           the little Territory of Ha-
           waii as compared with the
increasing gravity of the local Japan-
ese situation. While the islands are
enjoying unheard of prosperity through
the rise of the price of sugar, due to the
war, and while the numerous races are
living together in peace and outward
harmony on the islands, sinister condi-
tions of national, of international im-
portance, are quietly developing. The
abnormal increase in the Japanese pop-
ulation, the superior number of their
children in the public schools, the com-
paratively small portion of taxes con-
tributed by them, and the rapid in-
crease in the number of private busi-
ness owned by them is considered as
nothing less than alarming by many
students of island conditions.
   Gov. Lucius E. Pinkham, in his an-
nual report for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1915, makes the following sig-
nificant estimate, based upon the cen-
sus of 1910, plus steerage arrivals and
departures, and births and deaths re-
corded since 1910:
                    Census
Nationality.          1910.
Japanese  ...... 79,674
Hawaiian ...... 26,041
Portugese ....   .. 22,303
Chinese....          21,674
Estimate
June 30,
   1915.
   93,135
   24,120
   23,650
   21,770
EDITOR'S NOTE-Mr. Farrington comes from
Honolulu. He is therefore, acquainted with
the Japanese.               I
American - British ..
German - Russian .. 13,029
Filipino ...........  2,800
Part Hawaiian .... 12,506
Porto Rican ........  4,890
Spanish  ...........  1,990
Others ............   5,164
  Total ............ 190,071
Army and NavyN ..... 1,838
                     191,909
16,000
15,220
14,800
5,080
4,210
  5,270
223,256
  9,600
232,856
  That the Japanese hold a huge pre-
ponderence in the islands is evident
from the above. This in itself is of
little importance unless it is noted that
there has been an increase of 17.68 per-
cent in the Japanese population of the
islands since 1910; that race has al-
ways held .a numerical lead since the
(organization of the territorial govern-
ment in 1900. The rate of increase is
the cause of alarm. An abnormally
high birth rate is the direct cause of the
Japanese ascendancy, for the number
of steerage departures for the year end-
ending June 30, 1916, showed an excess
over the arirvals of 517 adults and 761
children. An excess of 1,009 female ar-
rivals over departures is probably due
to the great number of "picture brides"
imported each year. It is also signifi-
cant that during this last fiscal year
the following births were recorded:
Japanese ...        ....... 4,606
Chinese ...         .......      607
Hawaiian  ...........533
Part Hawaiian ......      ....   786
Portugese ....        ......     883
Spanish ...         .......      266
American ..........              211
Twenty


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