University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Literature Collection

Page View

Olbrich, M. B. (ed.) / The Wisconsin literary magazine
Vol. 1, No. 7 (June 1904)

Ashman, Margaret E.
"The wood-gatherers",   p. 265


Page 265


                 "THE WOOD-GATHERERS"                 265
idea may be torn by the roots from its setting in my mind,
and transferred like a tender plant to yours, it is time we
stood with bowed heads,' and here the little old New Zea-
lander bent his aged head in reverence, 'before the Goddess
of Science who is so rapidly unveiling to us the mysteries of
mind and matter.' When he finished the students rose and
gave three cheers for Eskinos Zotkna and filed out of Library
Hall, shouting 'U! Rah! Rah! Wisconsin!"'
  "What does it mean?" exclaimed the girls at one breath.
  Caryl could contain herself no longer. "It means," she cried
waving The Daily Cardinallike a flag of triumph, "it means
that Elizabeth Walton is at last revenged for 'my first ap-
pearance on the stage.' Get the girls and Betty and come to
a spread in my room at half-past nine to-night! 'It was only
a joke,"' she quoted.                 -Ora L. Mason.
          "THE WOOD-GATHERERS"
                 (Painted by Bastien-Lepage)
    A wood but newly clothed with spring time, where
    A misty miracle of green and gray
    Spreads tender vistas; flowers flaunting gay;
    A tiny maid with flowing yellow hair,
    Who, joyous, breaks the stems and smiles; and there-
    In all that freshness light with glad array-
    A shrunken form, a face-mere breathing clay,
    Where age looks out with dull death-stricken stare:
    This is the picture, somber, fair and strong,
    Too much of knowledge and of joy it brings.
    It wakens, like some old love burthened song,
    The deep reluctant throb of pain that wings
    The soul that looks on loveliness too long,
    And sees too far into the heart of things.
                              - Margaret E. Ashman.
  3-Lit.


Go up to Top of Page