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Gangelin, Paul; Hanson, Earl; Gregory, Horace (ed.) / The Wisconsin literary magazine
Volume XXI, Number 1 (October 1921)

Contents



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Publication of the Students of the University of Wisconsin  /
Volume XXI                 Madison, October, 1921              Number 1
CONTENTS
F
Editorials ......    ............ P. V. G.
Threnody .................. Horace Gregory....
Portraits of the Immortals..Horace Gregory....
Labor Day ..................   Don Hanson....
A Song ................. Katherine Rockwell ....
Anti-Climax .................. Paul Gangelin....
Summer School Models .. Katherine Rockwell....
Frank Harris ............. Alfred Galpin, Jr....
Dream-Castles ................ Roland Weber .
Hard-Boiled ................... Earl Hanson....
Jijiboom  Papers ..........J..... ohn Cunan ....
A Great Day: Henrik Pontoppidan.............
................................Earl Hanson ....
The Age of Fable .Lloyd George....
"Main Street" ............... Proehl H. Jaklon....
A Gift ................... Dorothy Shaner ....
A La Mascarade .......... Gaston d'Arlequin....
Dust from a Bookshelf ........... Diaskeuast....
VA1 1-    _a At S ;QomzA p14, -   -   A-T.,A
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I 11-0l -b -w5alllue. Clair de Lune ...........
.......................... .Roland Weber ....  28
THE FOLLY OF ACTIVITIES. There is power in these
hazy October twi-
lights to emphasize the discouraging contrast between
college life as it is and as it ought to be. October
tempts one to take life leisurely, to enjoy the heightened
colours of everything from lakes to elm trees, to lose
oneself in the enchantment of the haze that it lays
on distant prospects. That is how college life should
be: with freedom to think and to work and to play.
Instead we are the hurried slaves of the doctrine of
getting ahead. In our microcosm we worship the same
gods that are worshipped in Chicago and New York
and Spencer, Iowa. We have our miniature eminent
citizens, politicians, fine minds, energetic business men
-yes, even virtual chambers of commerce. Like
our age, we live for the future, and we won't let the
future come. We do not use our brains here in col-
lege to enjoy life and to enrich it; we harry them to
make us insignificantly great, to achieve the pettiest
of triumphs. We load ourselves with work and with
the hardware of honorary societies and rejoice in the
"practical" experience which our various endeavours
yield us.
All this because we subscribe to the "go and get
it" view of life. For most of us of this highly
acquisitive generation there is no other view-we have
been taught no other. We do not know that life
can be lived comfortably and successfully, that we
can do the things we like instead of the things we
think we have to do, and still prosper. We are typi-
fied by the automobile -rushing through the land, de-
lighting in the one sensation of motion, and overlook-
ing all others because they might retard our speed.
ADVICE. The editors of the LIT like to read contri-
butions-large numbers of contributions.
But they like, also, to have them approach in some de-
gree the standard of printable material. There are
people in school who can write and don't, and there are
people who do write and can't. We like to stimulate
the former class. To the latter, we should like to give
a few words of friendly advice: Before they submit
material, it is well to learn the difference between a
split infinitive and a cracked femur, to know that the
peak of fine and engaging writing was not reached
in "Elsie Dinsmore" or the "Rover Boys" series or
by Luke McLuke. Far be it from us to discourage
efforts at composition, but if we can point out grace-
fully and without arrogance that writing even for the
LIT requires some knowledge of the mechanics of the
art and some background, we should like to do so.
INCIDENTALLY. A ton or so of contributions wander
into the LIT office every month.
The greater portion of this, is, naturally, not to be
used. About one out of every twenty-five contribu-
tors takes the precaution to enclose a return envelope
and stamp. Whether the others want their contri-
butions returned or not, does not appear. If they do,
we should be extremely pleased to have them indi-
cate their desires mutely by means of the envelope
and the stamp. Time presses in this complex civili-
zation, and an overburdened editor would appreciate
this assistance.
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