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Braley, A. B. (ed.) / The Wisconsin literary magazine
Vol. II, No. 1 (October 1904)

Ashman, Margaret E.
Compunction,   p. 9


Page 9


COMPUNCTION
think that in a certain cafe there I once ate a most pleasing
dinner, with a pleasing gentleman, a real New York clubman,
and that I enjoyed myself very much. You see this means a
whole lot to me. Now I must be going, because Auntie will be
waiting for me."
  She arose and accepted the light wrap which Caruthers had
silently handed to her. He escorted her through the maze of
tables, through the door and to the crowded pavement.
  "I shall never forget this evening," he said slowly.
  "Nor I," she replied, as she waved to a coachman. She stepped
lightly into the carriage and held out to him her small gloved
hand. "Here," she said, "a token of friendship between an
in-
cognita and an incognita. Goodbye, for you go to your world and
I to mine."
  And the carriage rolled around the corner.
                                                 -Pyatt.
                  COMPUNCTION
     In her sweet eyes I gazed when back I came
        From year-long absence; sudden glad surprise
     Leaped up and died away in maiden shame,
                In her sweet eyes.
     My words a year ago were scarcely wise.
       I think I meant them then-am I to blame
     That fancies change and new desires arise?
       Not long the heart of man remains the same;
     In woman's heart they say love never dies-
       I would I had not seen that tell-tale flame
               In her sweet eyes.
                                  -Margaret E. Ashman.
9


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