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Ringler, Dick / Beowulf: A New Translation for Oral Delivery (May 2005)

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2a1a(ii) Cruel evidence
2b2b of the clash that ensued
2b1b between Swedes and Geats
+1d1 was seen everywhere,
2c1b how those proud peoples
+1a*1a(i) competed in hatred.
1d1 Old Ongentheow,
1a*1a(i) angry and bitter,
2c1a fell back baffled
5900 ++1a1a(i) with his band of comrades,
1a*1a(i) hoping for safety
3b1a on higher ground.
3b1b He had heard men praise
2a1a(iii) Hygelac's prowess
3b*1a and daring in war;
3b*1a he doubted his own
2e1b power to defeat
2b2a the prince and protect
+1a1b(i) the wealth of his kingdom,
5910 +1a*1a(i) its women and children,
3b1b from attacking troops,
3b*1c so he retreated at once
2c1c behind a high earth-wall.
3e*1 Hygelac was quick
2b1b to pursue the Swedes;
3b1b his excited troops
1a1a(i) stormed the stronghold
3b*1b and his standards were soon
1a*2a(ii) pouring implacably
5920 ++1a1a(i) through that place of refuge.
1d1 Old Ongentheow,
1a*1a(i) angry and grizzled,
2b1a was brought to bay
2c1a by bright sword-blades;
3b1a the fearsome Swede
+1a1b(i) was forced to acknowledge
+1a1a(i) the sword of Eofor,
+1a1a(i) the son of Wonred.
2a1a(i) Eofor's brother,
5930 2e1a eager young Wulf,
+1a*1a(i) had struck him already,
2b1a and streams of blood
1a1b(i) poured from a scalp-wound,
+1a1b(i) but pain did not daunt him,
3b*1b the intrepid old Swede;
2b1b he returned the stroke,
2a1a(ii) whirling instantly
+1a1b(i) toward Wulf his assailant,
+1a*1b and bashed him with a brutal
5940 2b2- blow in exchange.
+1a1b(i) It hewed through his helmet
3b*1a and hammered his skull
2b1b so that Wulf the son
+2a1a(i) of Wonred staggered,
2b1- tried in vain
2b1b to return the blow,
2b2a then lurched to the ground
2e1a lathered in gore;
3b1a that angry stroke
5950 +2a1a(iii) had injured him badly,
2b1b but his life was spared
3b1a by lenient fate.
2b1c While he lay bathed in blood,
+2a1a(i) his brother Eofor
3b1b let his massive blade
1a1b(i) made by the giants
1a1a(i) hew the giant
1a1a(ii) helm of Ongentheow
3b1c above his ancient shield;
5960 3f1a the old Swede
1d1 died instantly
2b2a and dropped to the ground.
3b*1a A huddle of Geats
2e1a hurried at once
3f1b to assist Wulf
3b1b when they safely could,
3b1b when the Swedish troops
2b2b had been swept from the field.
2a1a(i) Eofor plundered
5970 3e1 Ongentheow's corpse,
2e1a stripping the king
2c1b of his steel mailcoat,
2c1a his high helmet,
+3e1 his hard-hilted sword.
3b1a The bloody spoil
+1a1a(ii) was brought to Hygelac,
3b*1b who received it with thanks
+1a1b(i) and swore to give Eofor
2e1a dazzling rewards,
5980 3f1b which he did, too,
2b1b when they came back home;
2b2a the king of the Geats,
+1a1a(i) the heir of Hrethel,
3b*1a gave Eofor and Wulf
3b1a unwonted wealth
++1a1a(i) to reward their valor:
+2a1a(i) a hundred thousand
1a1a(i) hides of folk-land,
1a*1a(3a1) farmsteads of fabulous value;
5990 a1d(1a*1b) nor could he be faulted for that largess,
2a1(1a*1a) idly censured by others,
a1c(1a*1a) since they had earned it in battle;
+2e1b and Eofor got the king's
2a1a(i) only daughter
2b2b as a prize for his hearth
++1a1a(i) and a pledge of favor.
2b2a And here is the root
3b*1b of the hatred and rage
+1a1a(i) to soothe whose seethings,
6000 3b1a I sadly fear,
2b1a the Swedes will soon
1a1b(i) seek to destroy us,
2b2b when they learn that our lord
3b*1a and leader is dead,
+2a1a(i) the war-chief lifeless
2b1a who once preserved
+1a1a(i) the hoard and homeland
+2a1a(i) of hapless Hrothgar
3b1a from monstrous foes
6010 2c1b after much slaughter;
3b*1b he delivered the Danes
+2e1b and later persevered
3b1a in noble deeds.
+1a1b(i) But now let us hurry
2b2a to look on the place
2b1b where our lord lies dead,
+1a1a(i) then bear his lifeless
2a1a(ii) body solemnly
3b1b to the funeral pyre.
6020 2a1a(iii) Fabulous treasures
+3e1 will melt with him there,
2a1a(iii) measureless riches,
+3e1 the wonderful hoard
+1a1a(i) he won by dying.
2e1a Bracelets and rings
2b2- bought at the cost
3b1b of his precious blood
3b*1a must perish by fire.
1a1b(i) Flames will consume them,
6030 2b2b and his friends will not wear
+1a1b(i) those rings in remembrance
+2a1a(iii) nor radiant maidens
1a1a(i) clasp those circlets
3b1b round their comely throats;
+1a1b(i) instead they will often,
1a1a(ii) stripped of jewelry
2b2b and with woe in their hearts,
2a1a(ii) wander exile-paths,
1a1b(i) now that our leader
6040 2c1b has renounced laughter
2b1b and the mirth of men.
1a*1a(i) Many a spear-shaft
2b2b will be grabbed in dismay
2c1a on grey mornings
2b1- numb with frost;
3b*1b it will not be the harp
+1d1 that wakes warriors,
2c1b but the wan raven
1a*1b cawing over corpses,
6050 1a*1b croaking to the eagle
2c1a what fine feeding
+1a1a(i) he found this morning,
1a*1a(i) gnawing at bodies
2b2- next to the wolf."
+2a1a(i) The speaker ended
+1a1a(i) his speech and neither
2b2b what he said of the past
+1a1b(i) nor saw in the future
+1a1a(i) was much mistaken.
6060 3e*1 Mournfully, the Geats
1a1a(i) all went trooping
3b1b under Eagle Bluff
+1a1a(i) to see the marvel;
+1a1a(i) their souls were weeping.
+1d1 At last, lying there
2e1b lifeless on the sand,
2b1b they beheld their lord,
2b2a the hand that had once
3e1 given them gold,
6070 2c1a their great leader;
2b2a the king of the Geats
2b2a had come to the end
2c1b of the world, dying
3b1a a wondrous death.
2b1b As they neared the spot
2a1a(i) they noticed something
2c1b even more wondrous,
+2a1a(i) the monstrous serpent
1a*1a(i) lying beside him,
6080 1a*1a(i) loathsome and mottled,
3f1a its skin seared
2b2a and scorched by the flames,
2a1a(i) fifty fearful
3f1- feet long
2b2b where it lay on the ground.
2b2b While it lived, it was fond
3b*1a of soaring at night,
3b1a then swooping back
3b1b to its noisome den;
6090 2b2- now it was dead;
3b*1b it had guarded its last
2e1a gold-hoard on earth.
1a*1a(i) Standing beside it
+1a1a(i) were stoups and flagons,
1d*1(i) dishes, drinking-horns
+3e1 and damascened swords,
2b1- thinned by rust
3b1b and their thousand years
+2a1a(i) of lying idle
6100 2b2b in the lap of the earth.
+1a*2a(ii) Moreover those rareties
+2e1b and relics from the past,
3b*1a those treasures of gold,
3b*1b were protected by spells,
3b*1b so that no man on earth
2b1b could come near the hoard
2b1a or gain its gold
2b1b unless God himself,
+3e*1 the guardian of men
6110 +1a*1a(i) and granter of triumphs,
+2a1a(i) vouchsafed him safety
++1a1a(i) and unsealed the treasure:
2c1a some great hero
+1a1b(i) whom God found deserving.

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