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Ringler, Dick / Beowulf: A New Translation for Oral Delivery (May 2005)

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XXXVII

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2b1b We have heard that then,
3b1b in the high-king's need,
2a1a(i) faithful Wiglaf
5390 2b1a put forth the strength
2c1a and huge courage
++1a1a(i) that were his by nature.
++1a*1a(i) He was ardent and eager
3b*1b when he aided his king;
+1a*1a(i) ignoring the dragon's
3b1a enormous head,
2b1a he smote its soft
1d1 smooth underside,
2e1a singeing his hand
5400 2b1b when he swung the sword,
+3e1 but driving it deep
3b1b in the dragon's gut,
2e1a damping its fires.
1a1a(i) Dazed but conscious,
3e1 Beowulf pulled
2c1a a bright dagger,
2c1a his sharp war-knife,
2b2b from the sheath on his belt
+1a1a(i) and sliced the smooth-skinned
5410 2e1a serpent in half.
1a*1a(i) Working together
2b1a as one, the two
1a*1a(i) kinsmen had conquered
+2a1a(ii) their common enemy,
2a1a(i) Wiglaf fighting
3b2b as a warrior should
3f1b by his lord's side
3b2c in the illustrious king's
2c1- last battle,
5420 2c1a the last triumph
2b2b of his work in the world;
++1a1a(i) for the wound the ancient
3e1 grave-dwelling worm
+2a1a(iii) had given him started
+1a1a(i) to swell and swelter
2b1a and soon he felt
+1a1a(i) inside his body
1a*1a(i) surges of venom
1a*1a(i) boiling and seething.
5430 2a1a(iii) Beowulf staggered
2b2b to a slab in the wall
+1d1 and sat heavily.
+1a1b(i) He stared at the earth-hall,
2c1b saw the stone arches
+1a*1a(i) supported on pillars
3b*1a that propped it within,
2c1a this broad barrow
1a1a(i) built by giants.
2a1a(i) Meanwhile Wiglaf,
5440 1a1a(i) moved by pity,
3e1 hurriedly splashed
1a*1a(i) handfuls of water
2c1b on his king, injured
3b*1a and covered with blood.
3b1b When the kindly youth
++1a1a(i) had unclasped his helmet,
3e1 Beowulf spoke,
2e1a braving the pain;
2b1b he was well aware
5450 ++1a1a(i) that the wound had brought him
2b2b to the end of his life
+1a1a(i) and all enjoyment
2c1a of earth's riches,
2b2b to the end of his long
1a1a(i) days and doings;
+1a1a(i) now death was waiting.
3b*1a "How gladly," he said,
++1a1a(i) "I would give this war-gear
++1a1a(i) to my heir, if only
5460 3b*1b I had ever been blessed
2b2b with a son who might reign
3b*1b in succession to me
2b2b in the realm of the Geats.
+1a1a(i) I ruled this people
3b1a for fifty years.
3b1a No foreign king,
1a1b(i) none of the princes
+3e1 of neighboring lands,
1a1a(i) dared attack me
5470 3b1a with deadly force
2c1a or wage warfare.
+1a*1b I waited, in my homeland,
3b*1b for the harvest of fate;
2b2a I held what was mine
+1a1a(i) but sought no quarrels
2c1a nor swore many
1a1a(i) oaths unjustly.
2b1a For all these things
+1a1a(i) my soul is grateful
5480 2b1c though I am sick to death.
+1a1a(i) The Lord of heaven
3b1b will have little cause
++1a*1a(i) to accuse me of killing
2e1a kinsmen, when life
+1a1b(i) has flown from my body.
2a1a(i) Faithful Wiglaf!
1a*1a(i) Go now, and enter
2b1a these grey stone walls
+1a1a(i) to see the treasure!
5490 +2a1a(i) The serpent lies here
1a1b(1) robbed of its riches,
2e1a rigid in death.
2c1c Do not delay, Wiglaf,
2b2d if I am to look on those heaps
+1a1a(i) of gems and jewels
2b1b and enjoy a glimpse
3b1b of the golden hoard,
3b*1d so that after gazing my fill
3f1c on its immense wealth
5500 3f1c I may with more ease
3b*1a relinquish both life
2b2b and this land I have ruled."

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