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Ringler, Dick / Beowulf: A New Translation for Oral Delivery (May 2005)

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XXXI

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+1a*1a(i) His customs were kingly,
2c1a his court noble,
2b1b and I found no lack
4290 3b*1a of fitting rewards:
3b1a the highborn son
+2a1a(iii) of Healfdene gave me
3e*1 ornaments as rich
+1a*1b as any I could hope for.
3b*1a And here, now, my lord,
3e*1 Hygelac my king,
2b1c I give them all to you,
+2a1a(ii) since every benefit
3b*1b I have ever received
4300 2b1a I owe to you,
+1a*1a(i) my closest and kindest
2e1a kinsman on earth."
3b*1a He bade men bring in
+2a1a(i) the boar-head standard,
2c1a the great helmet,
2c1a the grey mailcoat,
3b1a the splendid sword
+1a1a(i) and spoke as follows:
2e1a "Hrothgar, the wise
4310 1a*1a(i) ruler of Denmark,
1a*1a(i) gave me this war-gear
2b1a to give to you,
+2e1b but told me I should first
1a1a(ii) tell its history.
3b*1a These weapons, he said,
2b1a had once belonged
2c1b to the high war-king
3e*1 Heorogar the Dane,
2b1a who grudged the gift
4320 2b2b of the gear to his son,
+1d1 to lord Heoroweard,
2e1b loyal though he was.
2e1a Use it with joy,
2c1a my young master!"
2b1b It is said that four
2a1a(iii) swift-footed horses,
3f1- matched bays,
3e1 marvelous steeds,
2e1a brought up the rear;
4330 2a1a(iii) Beowulf gave them
2b2b to the king, which is how
+2e1b a kinsman should behave,
2c1- not weaving
1a1a(i) nets of malice
a1b for a kinsman,
2a1a(iii) cruelly scheming
+1a1a(i) to harm a comrade.
2a1a(iii) Hygelac's nephew
3b*1a was loyal and true
4340 +2a1a(i) and loved him dearly,
+1a1a(i) and each thought only
3b1b of the other's good.
+1a1b(i) I heard that the hero
2b1a gave Hygd the great
3a1(1a1a) glorious gold necklace
+1a1a(i) he got from Wealhtheow,
2c1a and three horses,
1a*1a(i) thick-maned and graceful,
2c1a with bright saddles;
4350 2b2a her breast was adorned
1d1 long afterward
3b1b by that lustrous gift.
+1a1b(i) And so, with unceasing
3e*1 sapience and strength,
+1a1a(i) the son of Ecgtheow
2b2- sought after fame
2c1b and pursued glory.
+1a1b(i) His soul was untroubled;
3b1a he hewed down none
4360 ++1a1a(i) of his hearth companions,
3b*1a but guarded the gifts
1a1a(ii) God bestowed on him
+1a1a(i) with skill and greater
+1a*1a(i) discretion than any
3e*1 warrior on earth.
1a1b(i) Once, in his boyhood,
+1a1b(i) the thanes of his people
+2a1a(i) had thought him useless
2c1a and King Hrethel
4370 ++1a1a(i) had declined to give him
3b*1a approval or praise
3b*1a through presents at mead;
+1d1 they all looked on him
3b1b as an idle youth,
+2a1a(i) a lazy princeling.
2b1a He lived to see
3b*1a this judgment reversed
2b1b and enjoy respect.
+1d1 And now Hygelac
4380 3b2b the munificent king
3e*1 ordered men to fetch
+1a*1a(i) an heirloom of Hrethel's,
3e*1 radiant with gold;
2b2b in the the realm of the Geats
3f1b there was no sword
2b1b more renowned than it.
3e*1 Beowulf was brought
2b2a this blade and confirmed
3b*1c in his ancestral estates,
4390 2a1a(i) seven thousand
2b1- hides of land
2c1b and a high gift-throne.
3e*1 Both of them, the king
+3e*1 and Beowulf, had land
a1b in that country,
2b1a the king much more,
2c1a the whole kingdom,
3b*1c since he was higher in rank.
2b1b It would come to pass
4400 3b1b in the cruel wars
2c1b of the harsh future,
+3e*1 when Hygelac was dead
2c1b and his son Heardred
++1a1a(i) had been slain in combat,
2a1a(i) bravely thrusting
3b1a his battered shield
3b1b against savage hordes
3b1a of Swedish foes
3b*1c who had invaded his land
4410 3b*1a and vanquished his troops,
1a*1a(i) hacking the nephew
+3e*1 of Hereric to death---
2b1b it would come to pass
2b2b that the crown of the Geats
+1d1 became Beowulf's.
2b2b He was king of that realm
3b1a for fifty years,
+1a*1a(i) befriending its people
+1a*1a(i) and serving their interests,
4420 3b1d until a usurper came
2b2a to rule in the night,
+2a1a(i) a raging dragon
+1a*1a(i) who guarded a gold-hoard
2c1b in a great barrow
2b2b on the rim of the heath,
2b2- reached by a path
2e1b secret and obscure.
+1a*1a(i) But someone had found it,
2b1b had approached the mound
4430 +1a1b(i) and prowled round the treasure,
2a1a(iii) hurriedly grabbing
2c1a a huge goblet
3b*1b and then dashing away.
3b1b When the dragon found
e1c it had been robbed
3b2b by some rascally thief
2b1a while sound asleep,
2b2a it soon let the whole
3e1 neighborhood know
4440 2b1b how annoyed it was.

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