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Ringler, Dick / Beowulf: A New Translation for Oral Delivery (May 2005)

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IV

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2c1a The bold captain
++1a1a(i) of the band of comrades
2e1a quickly replied
3b1a in careful words:
d1b "We are mariners,
520 2b2- men of the Geats,
1a1a(i) hearth companions
+3e*1 of Hygelac our king.
+1a*1a(1) My father was famous
2c1b for his fierce warfare,
+2a1a(i) a noble chieftain;
+1a1a(i) his name was Ecgtheow.
3f1c He had a long life
2b1b and at last he died,
1a1a(ii) wise and worshipful.
530 1a*1a(i) War-chiefs of even
2a1a(i) modest wisdom
+3e1 remember him still!
2b2b As for us, we have come
+2a1a(i) in honest friendship,
2e1a seeking your king,
+1a1a(ii) the son of Healfdene.
1a*1b Kindly give us counsel!
+1a*1a(i) We carry important
1a1b(i) news for your master,
540 +2a1a(i) for noble Hrothgar,
+2e1b though only when we meet
2b2b can it all be disclosed,
2b1- not before.
2b2a You know if the tales
3b*1b they have told us are true,
+2a1a(iii) the terrible stories
2b1b that among the Danes,
+1a*1a(i) when midnight approaches,
+2a1a(i) some awful monster
550 3b1c (but I have only heard
3e1 shadowy hints!)
1a1a(i) shows his hatred,
2e1b gorging on their flesh.
2c1b I can give Hrothgar
3b*1a some useful advice,
2b2- young though I am,
++1a1b(i) how the king and his comrades
+1a1a(i) can quell this monster,
3f1c if it is fate's will
560 2b1c that he should find relief,
a1b consolation
2c1b for his long sorrows,
2b2b and his dread and despair
3b*1a are destined to end.
2a1a(iii) Otherwise, ever
2e1b after, he is doomed
+1a1a(i) to live in anguish,
2b2a as long as his great
3e1 hall-building stands
570 2c1b with its high gables."
3b*1a The coastguard replied
+2a1a(i) in careful language
2b2b where he sat on his horse:
+2a1a(ii) "A seasoned warrior
3b*1b has the wisdom to weigh
+1a1a(i) both words and actions,
2b1b to assess their worth.
2c1b I perceive clearly
d1b that you seafarers
580 3f1b are sincere friends
2b2b of the king of the Danes.
1a1a(i) Keep your weapons
+2a1a(i) and travel onward.
3b*1b I will teach you the way.
a1c And I will also
2e1a order my men
+1a1a(i) to guard your vessel
+1d1 with great vigilance
2b2a from foes, where it lies
590 3b1a all freshly caulked
2b2a with tar on the sand,
3f1c until the time comes
3b1b when the splendid ship
3b1b with its spiral prow
1a1a(i) bears the hero
1a1b(i) back to his homeland.
3b*1a So gallant a man,
+1a1a(i) so great in virtue,
2b2a is bound to survive
600 2e1a battle unharmed."
1a1b(i) Men started moving,
2a1a(i) marching inland;
3e*1 motionless, the ship
+1a1a(i) lay moored behind them,
2a1a(i) tethered tightly.
+1a1b(i) On top of their helmets,
a1b above cheek-guards
2c1a of chased silver,
1d1 bronze boar-figures
610 2b2- bright from the forge
d1a protected them.
+1a1a(i) The troop, advancing
3f1b at a smart pace,
2b2- soon caught a glimpse
2c1b of the hall Heorot,
1a1a(ii) high and glittering,
1d*1(i) Hrothgar's residence,
3e*1 radiant with gold,
+1a1a(i) the best, most brilliant
620 2e1a building on earth,
2e1a lighting the land
+1a1a(i) for leagues around it.
1a*1a(i) Pausing, the coastguard
3e1 pointed it out
2c1b to the keen warband,
3b1d so they might more quickly make
2b2a their way to its door,
2b1a then wheeled his horse
+1a1a(i) and spoke in parting
630 3b1c to the resplendent troop:
3b1b "I must leave you here.
++1a1a(i) May the Lord almighty,
+1a1a(i) the King and Father,
2e1a keep you from harm
2c1b in this bold venture.
2b2c I must go back to the coast
2c1a to hold sea-watch
3b1b against hostile fleets."

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