University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Human Ecology Collection

Page View

Anslow, Florence / Practical millinery
(1922)

Chapter XI: Pleatings, ruchings and quillings; cockades, pleated and petal rosettes, and other ornaments,   pp. 119-128 PDF (1.9 MB)


Page 119

 
CHAPTER XI 
PLEATINGS, RUCHINGS AND QUILLINGS; COCKADES, 
    PLEATED AND PETAL ROSETTES, AND OTHER 
                      ORNAMENTS 
P LEATINGS, ruehings and quillings are made in a variety of 
     ways and many materials are quite suitable and effective for 
the purpose. A plain hat band is suitable for tailor-made hats 
and rather severe types of headgear, but a ribbon band with several 
sets of flat pleats or box pleats arranged at intervals is much more 
soft and pleasing on a satin straw, or one covered with tulle or 
chiffon. A length of pleated ribbon, tulle, lace or chiffon can be 
made into trim rosettes and cockades, and a pleated ribbon quill 
with a wired or feathered stem forms another pretty and durable 
trimming. 
   For a piece of single or knife pleating, three times the finished 
length will be required, i.e. 1 yd. of ribbon will produce 1 yd. 
of pleating. Chiffon, lisse, georgette and similar materials should 
be cut the weft way, i.e. from selvedge to selvedge, and used 
either twofold or fourfold for pleatings; for quillings they can 
be used twofold as the pleats are very closely laid and overlap 
considerably. 
   A closely-pleated quilling will take five or even seven times 
the finished length, so that to produce ½ yd. of quilling, 21 yd.
of fine lace or folded tulle of the required width would be needed. 
    Pleatings should be set in even pleats of J in. to I in. in width, 
which must meet or, in the case of narrow ribbon, slightly over- 
lap one another, and be held in place by being sewn finely with 
running stitches about I in. from   one edge.   Ruchings are 
pleated in the same way but are sewn exactly along the centre 
of their width. Some of the more fanciful forms of pleatings are 
sewn along both edges. Knife pleating used to be gauged over 
a knife blade, and the kilting or pleating machine used in millinery 
                              119 


Go up to Top of Page