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Anslow, Florence / Practical millinery
(1922)

Chapter X: Hat and bonnet linings, and bandeaux,   pp. 110-118 PDF (1.7 MB)


Page 117

 
HAT AND BONNET LININGS, ETC. 
pinned on the cross of the material if it is to fit well. The edges 
can either be lace-stitched together from side to side (Fig. 16a), 
or catch-stitched to the lining (Fig. 17). Care is needed at the 
corners to prevent clumsiness where all superfluous material 
should be trimmed away. The outer side of the bandeau is 
covered with silk, which must be well strained over the stiffening 
and pinned to fit it, the edges being turned in narrowly, and 
afterwards finely slip-stitched to the velvet all round. 
   Figs. 10 and 11 are usually covered with either velvet or silk, 
though net and ninon are sometimes chosen. The material is 
cut on the cross to the length of the bandeau measurement, the 
width being two-and-a-half times the depth of the bandeau. For 
Fig. 12 the velvet could be joined into a ring to fit the bandeau 
exactly before being strained over it. Fit the inner side of the 
bandeau, first turning I in. of material over the straight edge, 
and pinning it well to the stiffening; then turn the velvet over 
to the outer side as in Fig. 18, turn in the edge and slip-stitch 
round. 
   Fig. 11 requires careful management at the rounded ends, 
where the covering must be cut to shape before it is sewn. 
   Figs. 13 and 14 have only one exposed side when stitched 
into the head-part of the hat, so it is not necessary to cover the 
under-side except for the satisfaction of making a good finish to 
the work. The covering is cut to the shape of the bandeau with 
the cross of the fabric to the cross of the stiffening. It is then 
fitted round the stiffening with pins, the edge turned over, and 
" cat "-stitched down as in Fig. 17. The under covering is pinned
flat over, the edges turned in and slip-stitched to the edge of the 
bandeau all round. 
    A bandeau is sometimes covered with a piece of gathered 
velvet which is lightly puffed on the outer side to give a little 
fullness and softness to the underpart of the hat. This is a good 
method to employ when the hair of the wearer of the hat is thin ; 
also when the hair dressing is severe in style and drawn back 
tightly from the face above the ears. 
117 


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