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The Day's food in war and peace
([ca.1918])

Lesson III: [Wheat, why to save it and how to use it],   pp. 31-40 PDF (2.7 MB)


Page 32

WHEAT, WHY TO SAVE IT AND HOW TO USE IT. 
Dr. ALoNzo E. TAYLoB, 
United States Food Administration, and the War Trade Board. 
Wheat belongs to the group of foods known as cereals. The six most promi-
nent in the production of the world are wheat, rye, barley, oats, dorn, and
rice. 
In nearly every part of the world' some form of cereal food' makes up the
greater portion of the diet. This has come about for several reasons: The
cereal 
grains are easily grown, stored, and prepared for the table; they are both
palatable and wholesome; they are on the whole the cheapest and best source
of 
energy for our bodies; and they also furnish tissue-building and body-regulat-
ing materials. 
When eaten in a mixed diet with fruits a'nd vegetables and animal foods,
the' 
different "ereal grains have practically ideiftical food values. They
contain 
about 70 per cent starch, from 7 to-12 per cent protein, and from 2 to 6
per cent 
fat. Oats is the richest in fat, rice the poorest in protein. They are lacking
in lime but this is added when they are eaten with milk. 
A pound of uncooked cereal yields practically f,600 calories---one hundred
calories for each ounce. Two pounds of flour would give enough energy to
support for one day a man at moderately'heavy work, though this would by
no means be an ideal diet for the best maintenance of health. 
If cereals are depended on chiefly, to the exclusion of meat, dairy products,
and vegetables, it is necessary to use the whole grains because the inside
of 
the grain is lacking in certain substances necessary to health. If, on the
other 
hand, the diet contains a normal amount of dairy products, fruits, and vege-,
tables, this is not necessary and the choice may depend on the taste of the
individual. 
"The amount of material supplied by each of the different food groups
in 
the daily diet of a man at moderate work may vary somewhat as follows and
still conform with proper dietary habits in this country: 
Rich and comparatively  Plain and compara- 
expensive diet.   tively cheap diet. 
Cereals ........     ................... From 8 ounces up to 16 ounces. 
Milk ...................................... 8  ounces  (i  pint)  8 ounces.
Meats, eggs, cheese, etc .................... From 14 ounces down to 6 ounces.
(Use 2 ounces less for every additional half pint of milk.) 
Fruits and vegetables ..................... F rom 2 pounds down to 1 pound.
Fats.    .............................From 3 ounces down to 1  ounces. 
Sweets ...................................From 3 ounces down to 1  ounces."
I Unpublished material, Office of Hlome Economics, Department of Agriculture.
(32) 


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