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Hill, Clare, fl. 1900 / Millinery: theoretical and practical
(1909)

Wire shapes,   pp. 70-77 PDF (1.6 MB)


Page 77

 
WIRE SHAPES 
   Semicircular wires- 
     First from edge    ,       17 inches. 
     Second from edge   .       15 
     Third       ,,          . 13 
     From centre front to back. i I 
     First below .           . 13 
     Second below               1. I3 
     Third, next back   .       12 
   Tulle Covering.-Before the wire shapes can 
be considered complete they must have a light 
covering of tulle for net and jet bonnets, stiff 
unglazed net when used as foundations for silk 
or velvet, tubing for flowers. Tinsel, etc., is 
often used when the outer covering is to be 
lace, and a pretty effect can be produced by 
threading  coloured  beads, chenille, narrow 
ribbon, in a kind of lattice pattern over and 
under the wires. 
  The tulle is put on in lengths, over edge wire, 
and eased, then gathered to form a casing over 
wire, gathered up at centre of crown, made neat 
and fastened off (Diag. XXXIV., Supplement). 
  Making Shapes in Stiff Net.-Two methods 
are employed. First, a skeleton wire shape 
is made and a shaped covering of stiff net sewn 
on.   Second method is identical with that 
employed in making an Espatra shape, with 
the addition of a wire midway around the brim 
and at any part required to flute. 
  Point to remember-These shapes must not be 
made unduly heavy with wire. 
77 


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