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Ben Yƻsuf, Anna / The art of millinery: a complete series of practical lessons for the artiste and the amateur
(1909)

Lesson VIII: Mourning millinery,   pp. 114-139 PDF (4.3 MB)


Page 137

 
              THE ART OF MILLINERY 
but we must not forget the widow who has to go out to 
business after her bereavement; for her it is quite cor- 
rect to leave her heavy veil at home for state occasions 
and wear only a thin gauze face veil. 
  Mourning veils are especially hard for short, stout 
women to wear; let the saleswoman see to it that the 
veil is kept in long, narrow lines at the back; a toque 
with good elevation is best for such a woman. 
  A tall, slim woman may have the lines of her veil 
falling more about her form, and the woman of medium 
height with full form should have longer, narrower lines, 
keeping the veil at the back, and the chapeau small and 
neat. 
  Illustrations from photographs. 
  Fig. 12. Small widow's bonnet, plain covered, with 
double Alsatian bow across front, formed of folded 
crape. Veil two and one-quarter yards long, with 12- 
inch hem at back; frofit hem 7 inches wide. Draped 
over front to waist line, back laid in four box plaits. 
  Fig. 13. Same bonnet. Veil same length, io-inch 
hems at each end. One selvedge side is folded over 
four inches and laid in a deep box plait at the middle, 
with another on each side; these are pinned against the 
front bow, forming a wide coronet; the veil is invisibly 
pinned in easy flutes at the back. This is a very grace- 
ful arrangement; a small crape-edged face veil is cor- 
rect with this; to be carried and pinned under the long 
veil at the back. 
   Fig. 15. Parisian turban for second mourning. The 
brim is of wood silk braid; the wide soft crown of thick 
peau de soie is draped flat on top, with a couple of 
raised points at the left back, which is split. A flat strap 
of folded ribbon crosses the crown, held by two dull jet 
cabochons; at the back is a full double cascade bow of 
No. 12 peau de soie ribbon. 
   The veil is one and onl-half yards long by one yard 
wide, of silk Brussels net, run with peau de soie ribbon 
in widths Nos. 9 and 5, on a hem four and one-half 
                         137 


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