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Ben Yƻsuf, Anna / The art of millinery: a complete series of practical lessons for the artiste and the amateur
(1909)

Lesson VIII: Mourning millinery,   pp. 114-139 PDF (4.3 MB)


Page 114

 
THE ART OF MILLINERY 
               LESSON VIII 
           MOURNING MILLINERY 
OURNING           is a distinct and very important 
       branch of millinery, and many clever designers 
       command excellent salaries, devoting their entire 
artistic abilities to this work alone. The scope of ma- 
terials is limited, the colors restricted to black, white, 
and various shades of the blue lavenders and violets; 
and occasionally greys; in England, cardinal is added 
to this list, accepted because of its ecclesiastical use. 
Therefore a designer has a more difficult task to 
evolve from the small varieties at her disposal, head- 
gear at once suitable, becoming and artistic. 
                      Materials 
  The materials used are, first of all crape, in black 
and white. This comes in a number of grades of 
quality, some dull, some glossy, some crisp, some so 
soft, that if gathered into a handful it will not crush; 
but of all makes the "waterproof" is to be preferred. 
Next comes crepe de chine in black and white, the 
lusterless kind; chiffon, mousseline de soie, cr~pe-lisse, 
grenadine and tulle. In silks the rich dull grosgrain, 
peau de soie, and Ottomans of rich, heavy cord; and 
uncut velvet, in England known as "Terry" velvet; 
this comes in several sizes of welt, from very fine to 
quite a heavy cord; it may be used for deep mourn- 
ing, having a dull, deep surface not unlike crape; it, 
is admirable to cover frames, just as one would use 
velvet, and accentuate the depth of the mourning by 
crape trimmings. It is handsome also used to bind and 
trim hats of crepe de chine, dull felt, chip, Neapolitan, 
etc., as one would use velvet in colored work. Brussels 
nets and nun's veilings also come into use for veils, 
etc. 
  Wings, quills (Paradise and aigrette if permitted or 
desired), dull black jet, bright jet and white jet, all find 
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