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Anslow, Florence / Practical millinery
(1922)

Chapter IX: Lining, binding and facing brims,   pp. 105-109 PDF (927.6 KB)


Page 108

 
MILLINERY 
Remove the binding from the hat and join it into a ring, taking care 
that all joins run in the same direction. Arrange the binding, 
wrong side uppermost, round the upper edge of brim, and pin it 
either I in. or I in. or 1 in. from the brim-edge, according to the 
width of binding desired; stab-stitch the binding down to the 
brim, keeping the long stitches on top of the binding, as this 
produces an even line of stitching. Roll the binding over the 
brim-edge, turn in the edge 1 in., pin and slip-stitch to the brim, 
drawing the thread tightly so that the stitches will be quite 
invisible. 
    Method 3.-When a wide binding is required, cut and join it 
as described above, and strain the binding over the edge of the 
brim; turn in the edge I in. on the upper side, and slip-stitch 
to the brim ; then turn in I in. on the under side and slip-stitch 
it down. A wide binding can be nicely managed in this way. 
    Method 4.-Gathered or " rucked " bindings of either cross-
cut material or of ribbon are joined to equal two or two-and-a- 
half times the brim circumference. The quarters of the binding 
are marked, and gathering threads are finely run J in. from both 
edges of cross-cut strips, or quite near the edges if the bind is of 
ribbon. The quarters of binding are then pinned to the quarters 
of the upper-brim edge; the binding is sewn neatly and firmly, 
then turned over the brim edge and pinned into position to form 
a puckered edge. The under side of the binding is afterwards 
invisibly sewn to the brim. 
   Sometimes both edges of a cross-cut bind of silk are turned 
over a cord and lightly run down. The silk is then drawn up 
on the cords, and placed round the hat, the cords being tightened 
to fit the upper and lower brims, the ends being finished off 
beneath the gatherings. 
   Method 5.-Corded silk ribbon is used to form either a plain 
or a pleated binding round a brim. If the ribbon is put on quite 
plainly the edges should be either machined or very neatly back- 
stitched or slip-stitched to the brim. A binding of leather would 
be treated as a plain ribbon bind. 
108 


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