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The Day's food in war and peace
([ca.1918])

Lesson IX: [The childrens food],   pp. 99-108 PDF (2.9 MB)


Page 100

THE CHILDREN'S FOOD., 
By Dr. RUTH WHEELER, 
University of Illinois. 
The choice of food is an important factor in food conservation when adults
are considered; it is far more important in feeding children. The needs of
the 
growing body are complex and must be supplied abundantly, and yet overfeed-
ing in every sense must be avoided. Nothing must be given which can not be
easily digested and assimilated. Food is less truly wasted when it is thrown
into the garbage can than when It is fed to a little body that can not use
it 
but must, on the contrary, get rid of it as soon as possible to avoid illness.
This is a double or a triple waste. 
Foo6 NEEDS FOR GROWTH. 
The child grows at the rate of from 4 to 10 pounds a year for the first 16
years of life. During this time he mlnist have raw material from which to
build 
tissue, especially (1) protein, (2) many minerals such as lime, salts, and
phos- 
phates for teeth and other bons, and iron, without which growth and develop-
ment are impossible. He nnst have (3) fuel to keep the tissue factories 'going,
as well as to generate heat and motion, for which purpose fats and carbohy-
drates are especially 'valuable. He must have (4) traces of two kinds of
little-known substances which promote growth and prevent disease. 
GENERAL CHOICE OF FOOD. 
The majority of children in this country in families of moderate income 
have diets containing all of these constituents. - The purpose of this paper
is 
to discuss various common foods as to their value for children and to indicate
how one may judge whether a child is getting everything he needs and how
to 
correct the diet if it is wrong. Decide on the food the child should have
and 
then stick to it. Do not give tastes of other food. 
Milk. Milk contains all the food constituents necessary for growth except
iron, of w'hich it has very little.' No proteins that have been studied are
better for growth than milk proteins. No other food has so nearly perfect
a 
balance of minerals for building the growing bones and other tissues. It
con- 
tains both types of accessory substances. If it has a fault,, aside from
the 
small amount of iron, it is that it is too perfect-so completely digested
and 
absorbed that there is no residue to assist in the daily evacuation of the
in- 
testine. On this account, cellulose vegetables should be fed-spinach and
carrots especially, because they supply not only residue, but also iron.
Iron 
may also be given in egg yolk or meat juice. 
Since milk is so nearly perfect it is clear that it is the last food on which
to economize. Every baby and young child should have a quart' every day,
(100) 


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