University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The Human Ecology Collection

Page View

Shover, Edna Mann / Art in costume design: practical suggestions for those interested in art, sewing, history and literature
(1920)

Chapter V: Roman,   pp. [59]-71 PDF (3.5 MB)


Page 69

 
I 
    When the general was victorious he entered Rome in a chariot 
drawn by four horses. He was preceded by the captives and spoils 
taken in war, and was followed by his troop. Naturally, the most 
elaborate costumes were worn by the Romans who participated in, 
or attended these triumphal entries and the chariots and harness 
were most elegant. The great chariot races were also festivals of 
pomp and show. (Illustration 17.) 
The Fasces. The fasces was composed of a bundle of rods from which 
an axe projected. This was borne by the "Victors" whose duty it
was to walk before the chief Roman magistrates; to call to the 
people to make way and to serve as a body-guard. They also executed 
judicial sentences. The fasces became a symbol of authority. (Illus- 
tration 17.) 
    Though the abstract ornament was most commonly used, 
symbolism was again beginning to creep into decorative units as, for 
example, the lamb skin as an emblem of Jason and the Order of the 
Golden Fleece; the swan, emblem of Venus, goddess of beauty; and 
the figures of a female wolf under which crouched two children, the 
svmhnl of thi fmindincf Af lbnip 
ROA 
69 


Go up to Top of Page