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Hill, Clare, fl. 1900 / Millinery: theoretical and practical
(1909)

Notes on trimmings,   pp. 106-110 PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 106

 
MILLINERY 
        NOTES ON TRIMMINGS 
  The Manufacture of Paillettes or Spangles. 
-Epingles or spangles, sequins, etc., are largely 
imported from Bavaria, and in the Middle Ages 
were fashioned from precious metals. In those 
days strips of wire were bent into rings with 
pliers, placed on a slab and beaten out into the 
flattened spangle. Since then machines have 
been invented, similar in form to the sewing 
machine, but naturally heavier in make. These, 
instead of the usual needle, have a hammer over 
the plate; a bobbin of wire is affixed to the side 
of bottom plate, and a pair of pliers cuts the 
lengths required. A tube rounds the lengths 
as they fall and sets them on the plate beneath 
the hammer, which, descending, flattens the 
wire, and a finger of iron pushes the spangle 
into a receptacle beneath. 
  Espartra is made of dried esparto grass, 
with starched muslin stretched over it. The 
different makes of lace used in millinery come 
from France and England equally, Honiton, 
a small town in Devonshire, being noted for one 
of the most expensive makes, which is worked 
over pillows by hand. 
  In making felt hats thirty different processes 
are employed. 
io6 


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