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Hill, Clare, fl. 1900 / Millinery: theoretical and practical
(1909)

Pattern-taking,   pp. 18-20 PDF (648.7 KB)


Page 18

 
MILLINERY 
circumference of hat and adding i in. or more 
for every tuck. The width is generally twice as 
wide as it is intended to be when finished. 
   Binding Plainly.-Two or more crossway 
 pieces of material, measuring Ii in. through 
 the width, are joined by back-stitching selvedges 
 together; these are then stretched round the 
 hat brim to obtain the exact size; the surplus 
 cut off minus J in. ; the material joined in a 
 round and placed wrong side uppermost on top 
 side of brim; the edges of material and hat are 
 then back-stitched together, and the material 
 turned over edge and slip-stitched down. 
   Tucked Linings. - Full linings for under 
brims are as varied as the full edges, and like 
them prepared by tucking, gathering, etc., and 
should be sewn just above the wire. 
           PATTERN-TAKING 
  Obtaining the Pattern for a Plain-shaped 
Lining.- Pattern-taking must always precede 
the plain-shaped lining of straw or felt hats, 
as it must fit to perfection. The method of 
doing this is to take a sheet of paper, fairly 
soft, though not too soft, and cut out a section 
(Diag. V., Fig. I); the curved-out portion is 
then placed to headline on the hat brim 
(Diag. V., Fig. 2) and all paper beyond edge 
18 


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