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Hicks, Ada / Garment construction in schools
(1913)

Part IV: Typical faults in the making up of garments by children,   pp. [163]-169 PDF (2.0 MB)


Page [163]

 
PART IV. 
   TYPICAL FAULTS IN THE MAKING UP OF GARMENTS BY 
                               CHILDREN. 
               "Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see 
               Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be."--PoPE.
ALL practical teachers know of the many pitfalls awaiting the inexperienced
little needlewoman trying her hand on a " fresh" pattern, and much
time and 
trouble may be saved by systematic consideration of these before the event.
    Under ordinary conditions this is one reason why the " class"
system of 
teaching needlework, now so generally adopted, proves so much more success-
ful than the old " individual" system. In the latter, when nearly
every child 
in the upper classes was making a garment different from that of her school-
fellows, there was no common ground on which a teacher could base lessons
on 
various essential points. 
    With good enthusiastic class-teaching, however, to children all at the
same 
stage, in the construction of the same or similar kinds of garments, these
most 
necessary lessons can be given, and the results of the training will prove
to 
be far more effective. 
    The aim of all class teaching will thus be achieved, for, after all,
it is not 
the ability to do beautifully fine sewing under close supervision which will
prove useful in after life, but the power to plan, cut out and "put
together" 
garments unaided. 
    Whilst class instruction should be given as each point arises, and faults
avoided as far as possible, there is most useful training for children in
connec- 
tion with the imperfections and mistakes which must arise in every class.
    These should, wherever possible, form subjects for discussion. The 
children should be called upon to examine such work, to criticise it, to


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