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Ben Yƻsuf, Anna / The art of millinery: a complete series of practical lessons for the artiste and the amateur
(1909)

Lesson XV: Starting a millinery business,   pp. 226-235 PDF (1.8 MB)


Page 226

 
THE ART OF MILLINERY 
                LESSON XV 
    STARTING A MILLINERY BUSINESS 
 HEN one searches for the cause of individual 
         failures it may usually be traced to ignorance 
         of the business and its needs; a competent mil- 
 liner, in a carefully selected location, who is a judicious 
 manager, has ninety-nine chances in one hundred for 
 success. 
   There are, however, many women who, compelled by 
adverse circumstances to earn their own (and often de- 
pendents') living, select the millinery business because 
it is attractive and "looks easy." Such a woman, who 
has possibly never even trimmed her own hat, nor had 
any business experience, is more than likely to lose the 
money she invests, unless she has the sense to learn the 
business first, and also gain the necessary experience in 
some well-conducted showroom. A year spent in this 
preparation will open her eyes to very much that she had 
not the least idea of. 
   A woman desiring to start a business will do well 
to consult the salesmen and heads of firms of reliable 
wholesale houses; these men are in a position to know 
where such a business as any particular milliner desires 
to open might be profitably placed, and after consulting 
with a number the list may be carefully considered, a 
few selections made, the localities visited, inquiries made 
as to desirable quarters, rent, facilities, etc., and the. 
resulting information again carefully considered, and a 
final selection made. 
  There are many grades of business, but two distinct 
types only, i. e., "parlor millinery" and "store millinery."
                   Parlor Millinery 
  A store may be large or small; for the cheapest to the 
finest trade; but a "parlor" trade means a quiet, private 
trade, which is not dependent on "window" or "tran- 
                         226 


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