University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

United States congressional serial set: surrender of Italy, Germany and Japan, World War II
(1946)

Part III. Surrender of Japan,   pp. [69]-111 ff.


Page 98

years. It must be of the spirit if we are to save the
flesh.
We stand in Tokyo today reminiscent of our coun-
tryman, Commodore Perry, 92 years ago. His pur-
pose was to bring to Japan an era of enlightenment
and progress by lifting the veil of isolation to the
friendship, trade, and commerce of the world. But
alas the knowledge thereby gained of western science
was forged into an instrument of oppression and
human enslavement. Freedom of expression, free-
dom of action, even freedom of thought were denied
through suppression of liberal education, through
appeal to superstition, and through the application
of force.
We are committed by the Potsdam Declaration of
principles to see that the Japanese people are liber-
ated from this condition of slavery. It is my purpose
to implement this commitment just as rapidly as the
armed forces are demobilized and other essential
steps taken to neutralize the war potential. The
energy of the Japanese race, if properly directed, will
enable expansion vertically rather than horizontally.
If the talents of the race are turned into constructive
channels, the country can lift itself from its present
deplorable state into a position of dignity.
To the Pacific basin has come the vista of a new
emancipated  world. Today, freedom    is on the
offensive, democracy is on the march. Today, in
Asia as well as in Europe, unshackled peoples are
tasting the full sweetness of liberty, the relief from
fear.
In the Philippines, America has evolved a model for
this new free world of Asia. In the Philippines,
America has demonstrated that peoples of the East
98


Go up to Top of Page