University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

Berlin, Richard E., 1894- / Diary of a flight to occupied Germany, July 20 to August 27, 1945.
(1945?)

Blonde children--Hitler's "Aryan race",   pp. 42-43 PDF (468.9 KB)


Page 43


tiful children one could ever hope to see. Ninety-five percent
of the children are completely blonde with blue eyes and pink
complexions. They seem happy and well fed. Everywhere along
the roadside we see mothers with 3 or 4 of the always-present
blonde babies and are told that these represent Hitler's Aryan
race.
Stopped at the Victoria Hotel, where we were met by Brigadier
General Treadwell, a charming English officer. We were given
a delicious lunch with excellent Rhine wine. After luncheon
Brigadier General Treadwell motored us to Herford, where we
visited the headquarters of the British communication system. In
the news room we were briefed and then we inspected the com-
munication system  of the British headquarters.  Around the
British radio tower we noticed children playing, but they ran
from us as if in fear.
We motored back to Minden for tea in a beautiful German
home which had been "liberated" from an affluent German cigar-
maker. The term "liberated" is a common one. Throughout
Germany when British or American officers want to occupy a
home, they throw out the owner and occupy his premises, tell-
ing you that they have "liberated" the home. One usually learns
that the German owner is living in the garage, stables, or in one
of the servant's houses.
After tea we drove to the little town of Melle-the headquarters
of Field Marshal Montgomery-and motored directly to his home.
We were informed that Montgomery does not like to live adjacent
to his staff but prefers to isolate himself in the country. He lives
in a palatial castle which he "liberated" from one of the German
squires. The squire, we were told, was a rather docile individual,
but his wife is very sour and complains bitterly about the British
occupation.
Arriving at Field Marshal Montgomery's headquarters, we were
greeted by his aides and told that Monty was in the garden walk-
ing with his dogs.
43


Go up to Top of Page