University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
Link to University of Wisconsin Digital Collections
The History Collection

Page View

Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Memorandum from the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, on German reunification, May 27, 1957,   pp. 207-210 PDF (1.6 MB)


Page 209

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY,  1944-59
It is hardly possible, in the face of all these utterances, to draw any
conclusion other than that the Soviet Government is desirous at pres-
ent of preventing the reunification of Germany.
ULBRICHT S PROGRAMME TO PREVENT REUNIFICATION
The programme propounded by Party Secretary Ulbricht on Feb-
ruary 3, 1957, envisages an indefinite period of time during which
Germany would merely be a 'confederation', i.e. a loose association
of states to precede a phase of "negotiations on the basis of equality
concerning measures for holding free all-German elections for a na-
tional assembly".
The entry into this phase of 'confederation' and the transition to
the second phase-the negotiations on the actual reunification-are
made contingent upon so many conditions, most of them to be fulfilled
unilaterally and in advance by the Federal Republic, that the entire
programme cannot be regarded as any thing but a plan to prevent the
reunification of Germany and to uphold and extend the rule of the
communist functionaries.
SOVIET UNION S TURN TO MAKE CONSTRUCTIVE PROPOSALS
The Federal Government has been making or supporting construc-
tive- proposals without respite-the draft of an all-German electoral
law passed by the Bundestag in 1951, the 1954 'Eden-Plan' (Berlin
Conference) for holding free elections throughout Germany, and the
1955 revised 'Eden-Plan' (Geneva Conference of Foreign Ministers),
which was coupled with far-reaching security guarantees for the
Soviet Union for the event of reunification.
The Soviet Government declined to accept any of these proposals as
-a basis for negotiations. It, however, has never itself put forward a
constructive proposal stating clearly that it really would agree to
reunification if certain conditions were fulfilled.
The Federal Government knows that the unity of Germany can
result only from negotiations in which all the participants weigh the
advantages and disadvantages, of a solution, and make such mutual
sacrifices as are necessary in the interest of peace and security. The
Federal Government would weloornp, it if the Soviet Government also
-would allow herself to be guided by the same spirit in dealing with
the question of reunification.
WILLINGNESS TO DISCUSS THE ELEMENTS- OF A EUROPEAN SECURITY PACT
The Federal Government is prepared at any time to continue the
discussion on a security system capable of guaranteeing all the States
of Europe, including a reunited Germany, peace and freedom, within
the framework of the proposals put forward by the Western Powers
at the Geneva Conference of Foreign Ministers on October 28, 1955.
The Federal Government has no hesitation about linking an agreement
on the reunification of Germany with contractual obligations reaffirm-
ing the renunciation of force. Over and above this, it is prepared to
consider any other practical proposal that the Soviet Government may
care to put forward in connection with the reunification of Germany
in freedom.
-209


Go up to Top of Page