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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Statement by the American, British, and French foreign ministers, on the Soviet-GDR agreements, September 28, 1955,   pp. 158-159 PDF (864.5 KB)


Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, on the Soviet-GDR agreements, October 3, 1955,   p. 159 PDF (443.8 KB)


Note from the Soviet Foreign Ministry to the American Embassy, on the Soviet-GDR agreements, October 18, 1955,   pp. 159-160 PDF (920.5 KB)


Page 159

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 1944-59
They wish in the first place to emphasize that these agreements
cannot affect the obligations or responsibilities of the Soviet Union
under agreements and arrangements between the Three Powers and
the Soviet Union on the subject of Germany and Berlin. The Soviet
Union remains responsible for the carrying out of these obligations.
Secondly, the three Foreign Ministers reaffirm that the Federal
Republic of Germany is the only German Government freely and
legitimately constituted and therefore entitled to speak for Germany
as the representative of the German people in international affairs.
These-three governments do not recognize the East German regime
nor the existence of a state in the Soviet zone.
Finally, as regards a statement which has recently appeared in the
Soviet press on the frontiers of Germany, the three Foreign Ministers
reaffirm the repeatedly expressed position of their Governments that
the final determination of the frontiers of Germany must await a peace
settlement for the whole of Germany.
Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry,
on the Soviet-GDR Agreements, October 3,19551
The Government of the United States of America, in agreement
with the Governments of the United Kingdom and France, wishes to
make known its position with regard to the agreements concluded
at Moscow on the 20th of September 1955 between Marshal Bulganin
and Mr. Grotewohl, as published in the press.
-The three Governments declare that these agreements cannot affect
in any respect or in any way the obligations or responsibilities of
the U.S.S.R. under agreements and arrangements on the subject of
Germany, including Berlin, previously concluded between France,
the United States, the United Kingdom and the U.S.S.R.
The three Governments consider that the U.S.S.R. remains bound
by the engagements which it has assumed vis-a-vis the Three Powers
concerning Germany, and that, in particular, the letters exchanged
between Mr. Zorin and Mr. Bolz on the 20th of September 1955 can-
not have the effect of discharging the U.S.S.R. from the responsi-
bilities which it has assumed in matters concerning transportation
and communications between the different parts of Germany, includ-
ing Berlin.'
Note from the Soviet Foreign Ministry to the American Embassy,
on the Soviet-GDR Agreements, October 18, 19552
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics presents its compliments to the Embassy of the United
States of America and in connection with the latter's note of Octo-
ber 3 has the honor to state the following:
On September 20 of this year the Government of the Soviet Union
and the Government of the German Democratic Republic concluded
"A Treaty on Relations Between the Union of Soviet Socialist Re-
'Ibid., October 17, 19,55, p. 616. The British and French Embassies delivered
similar
notes on the same day. For the text of the Soviet reply of October 18, see
infra.
2Ibid., November 7, 1955, pp. 734-735.. For the text of the American reply
of October
27, see infra.
159


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