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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

British (Eden) plan for German reunification in freedom, January 29, 1954,   pp. 115-117 PDF (1.1 MB)


Soviet draft peace treaty with Germany, February 1, 1954,   pp. 117-119 PDF (1.1 MB)


Page 117

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 1944-59
open with the Four Powers, on a preliminary basis, negotiations for
the peace treaty.
IV. ADOPTION OF THE CONSTITUTION AND FORMATION OF AN ALL-
GERMAN GOVERNMENT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE NEGOTIATIONS OF THE
PEACE TREATY
The constitution will be submitted to the assembly as soon as possi-
ble after the final draft has been agreed. Immediately it has been
adopted an all-German government will be formed. This government
will then be responsible for the negotiations and conclusion of the
peace treaty. At the same time, such other institutions as may be pro-
vided for in the constitution shall be established.
As soon as the all-German government has been formed, the na-
tional assemblK will determine how the powers of the Federal Gov-
ernment and t e German authorities in the Soviet Zone shall be trans-
ferred to the all-German government, and how the two former shall
be brought to an end.
The all-German government shall have authority to assume the
international rights and obligations of the Federal Republic and the
Soviet Zone of Germany and to conclude such other international
agreements as it may wish.
Until the entry into force of the peace treaty, each of the Four Pow-
ers will exercise, with respect to the national assembly and the all-
German government, only those of its rights which relate to the sta-
tioning of armed forces in Germany and the protection of their secu-
rity; Berlin; the reunification of Germany; and a peace treaty.
Decisions of the national assembly and the all-German government
in carrying out this plan will not require the approval of the Four
Powers. Such decisions may not be disapproved except by a majority
vote of the Four Powers.
V. SIGNATURE AND ENTRY INTO FORCE OF THE PEACE TREATY
The signatories to the treaty should include all states, or the succes-
sors thereof, which were at war with Germany. The treaty should
enter into force when ratified by the Four Powers and by Germany.
Soviet Draft Peace Treaty with Germany, February 1, 19541
Almost 9 years have elapsed since the end of the war with Germany,
and Germany still has no peace treaty; it is still divided, and coiw-
tinues to be in a position of inequality in relation to other states.
It is necessary to put an end to such an abnormal situation.
This is consonant with the aspirations of all peace-loving peoples.
Without the speedy conclusion of a peace treaty with Germany, it
is impossible to insure equitable treatment of the German people's
legitimate national interests.
The conclusion of a peace treaty with Germany is essential for the
reinforcement of peace in Europe. A peace treaty with Germany'
'Foreign Ministemr Meeting: Berlin DiscuwaionM, January 25-February 18, 1954,
tpp.
225-227.
40109-59----9
117


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