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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1855
([1855])

[Northern superintendency],   pp. 40-47 PDF (3.1 MB)


Page 47

COMMISSIONER OF INDIAN AFFAIRS.                   47 
seven months, each six hours in a day and five days in a week. A 
good degree of interest has been manifested. Ninety different native 
children have attended, but the average attendance in the two schools 
has been but thirty-five, about an equal number of both sexes. Their 
progress has been as rapid as could be expected, considering that they 
are taught in the English language, while but a few of them under- 
stand it. The principal labor of the teachers has been bestowed in 
teaching them to read.   Eight study arithmetic, twelve write.    The 
interest on the subject of education is decidly advancing; and with 
many a considerable anxiety is manifested to prepare for citizenship. 
The most of this part of the nation are devoting themselves to 
agricultural pursuits. The following will show the interest this year 
compared with the preceding: 
1854.            No. of            1855.            No. of 
acres.                             acres. 
Corn or maize.....................161 Corn.   ...................  226 
Oate .a........................... .e190 Oats...........................
121 
Fall and spring wheat...............37  Fall and spring wheat..............121
Potatoes........................23  Potatoes..   ..o.............25 
Rye ................................  37  Rye............................
. 7 
Peas............................10  Peas............................22 
Beans .............................  15  Beans...........................14
Buckwheat....................... 25 Buckwheat.................. 
Meadow ............................  239  Meadow . .........................*
6 228 
Barley ............................. 1 Barley............................
Last year only nine acres of land were cleared for crops. This year 
(1855) there have been ninety acres cleared within the same extent of 
territory-from the nation's council-house southwest. 
Many of the nation are engaged in lumbering, greatly to the injury 
of the nation, as the traffic is attended with much idleness and intem- 
perance; and by it the pine timber is fast wasting away, while agri- 
cultural pursuits are neglected. 
Ten of the youth of the nation have been receiving education in the 
Lawrence University, supported partly by the government and partly 
by benevolent friends. Their progress has been respectable in all 
improvements. They promise usefulness to the nation. 
If some means could be devised to divide this nation into convenient 
districts, and supply them generally with the common schools, it 
would greatly facilitate their improvement in every respect; as it is 
now, less than half of the children are within convenient distance of 
the established schools. 
All of which is respectfully submitted. 
Yours, truly, 
C. G. LATHROP, 
H. E. Missionary to Oneida Indians. 
Hon. Dr. Humscim&im, 
&tpeintendent of Indian Affairs. 


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