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United States. Office of Indian Affairs / Annual report of the commissioner of Indian affairs, for the year 1905
Part I ([1905])

Reports of superintendents of independent schools,   pp. 415-440 PDF (11.7 MB)


Page 439

REPORT OF SCHOOL IN        VIRGINIA.                 439 
It is advisable to have vacation here during August and September on that
account. 
The industrial work the past year has been improved with the opening of the
dairy building, and will be still further improved when the industrial building
is erected. We have a splendid farm of 340 acres, almost all of which can
be 
cultivated. This will require the services of an experienced farmer. No amount
of technical knowledge in an employee will suffice in this position unless
he 
has a practical knowledge of the actual work. This is a department that should
yield considerable revenue, and will if it is properly managed, besides affording
a most excellent opportunity for instruction to the boys. 
The industrial work for the girls has been kept up systematically throughout
the year, and they have made great improvement. Regular classes have been
maintained all year. 
The literary work has been well done, and I feel that the pupils have made
as 
great improvement as if they had been in the public schools. A class of five
girls finished our literary work, and I think that they are well fitted to
enter 
the high schools of this State. One of them is attending high school now
and 
two of them have entered Hampton. 
The buildings and plant are in good condition. All of the buildings are prac-
tically new and are fitted with the usual modern conveniences. We have 
splendid water and a good sewerage system. The health of the school has been
good. The hospital was enlarged last year and now is large enough to meet
the demands made on it. 
L. M. COMPTON, Superintendent. 
REPORT OF HAMPTON (VA.) NORMAL AND AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE. 
HAMPTON, VA., June 30, 1905. 
There have been in attendance during the past year at the Hampton school
1l1 Indians, 50 of whom are girls and the remainder boys. Three of these
have 
been at the North during the winter: one has been taking a course in nurse
training- one has been going to a public school and working on a farm for
his 
board; the third has been doing general housework. The tribes represented
are as follows: Absentee Shawnee, Arapaho, Apache, Clallam, Cherokee, Chip-
pewa, Cayuga, Crow, Klamath, Little Lake, Navaho, Omaha, Onondaga, Oneida,
Pawnee, Peoria, Pima, Pueblo, Potawatomi, Sioux, Shoshoni, Seneca, Tuscarora,
Winnebago, Wichita, Yuki, Yuma. 
Thirteen girls and 22 boys have entered the school since July 1, 1904. They
were classified as follows: Junior middle, 4; junior, 19; preparatory, 7;
junior 
middle, night school, 2; junior, night school, 2; preparatory, night school,
1. 
Two of these are boys who returned for further training after a year at home,
and one a girl who came back after four years. The new students, nearly all
of whom came through the influence of former Hampton students, entered 
higher classes than ever before and are very promising in every way. This
is 
probably the effect of the wider use of application papers. The Indians now
in 
school are classified as follows: 
Girls. Boys. 
Postgraduate class. . .   .  .   .   .  .   .   .  .   ..-------------------------------------------------------
0  -  1 
Day school: 
Senior class .    .      .      .      ..-----------------------------------------------------------------1
Senior middle class -----------------------------------------------------------
1  4 
Junior middle class..  .  .   .   .  .   .   .  .   .  ..---------------------------------------------------
 10  9 
Junior class. . .   .  .  .   .  .   .  .  ..---------------------------------------------------------
27  21 
P reparatory  class . . . . . . . . .  . .  ..-----------------------------------------------
-  8  13 
Night school: 
Senior middle class.. . . . .  .  . .  .  ..   .  . .  ..-----------------------------------------------
0 
Junior middle class..  .   .   .   .   .  .    .  .    ..----------------------------------------------------10
 7 
Junior class. .  .   .  .   .   .   .  .   .   .   .   ..----------------------------------------------------------
 1  0 
Preparatory class---------------------------------------...............1
 0 
A t  the  :N orth  2.. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .1.. ..
. . . . . . . . 
Total------------------------------------..........................------50
 6 


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