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Zacour, N. P.; Hazard, H. W. (ed.) / The impact of the Crusades on Europe
(1989)

V: The Institutions of the Kingdom of Cyprus,   pp. 150-174 PDF (9.7 MB)


Page 174

 174 A HISTORY OF THE CRUSADES 
longer the essential characteristic of Cypriote institutions. Despite the
rebellion of the liegemen against Peter I, the Lusignan monarchy maintained
itself as the real master of the kingdom. Janus, John II, and James II governed
without concern for the control of the high court, which was completely transformed
by the very composition of the nobility. The Latin church, whose wealth remained
restricted, no more represented a force of opposition than did the Greek
church. The cities did not play a political role. The very crises which the
kingdom experienced, with the exception of foreign interventions, were more
the result of court intrigues and palace revolutions than of more profound
movements. It was indeed the permanence of a well-established monarchy which
guaranteed the stability of the kingdom of Cyprus, a mosaic of peoples, but
of peoples among whom a true symbiosis was achieved up to 1489, and even
beyond while under the domination of Venice. 


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