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Documents on Germany, 1944-1959 : background documents on Germany, 1944-1959, and a chronology of political developments affecting Berlin, 1945-1956
(1959)

Report by President Eisenhower to the American people, on security in the free world, March 16, 1959,   pp. 405-409 PDF (2.2 MB)


Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry, proposing a Foreign Ministers meeting at Geneva, March 26, 1959,   pp. 409-410 PDF (894.6 KB)


Page 409

DOCUMENTS ON GERMANY, 194 4-59
effort at. negotiation that will respect the existing rights of all and
their opportunity to live in peace.
*       *      .*        *        e       *       *
Today's Berlin difficulty is not the first stumbling block that Inter-
national Communism has placed along the road to peace. The world
has enjoyed little relief from tension in the past dozen years. As long,
as the Communist empire continues to seek world domination we
shall have to face threats to the peace, of varying character and loca-
tion. We have lived and will continue to live in a period where emer-
gencies manufactured by the Soviets follow one another like beads
on a string.
Whatever the length of that period, we shall have to remain con-
tinuously ready to repel aggression, whether it be political, economic
or military. Every day our policies of peace will be subjected to test.
We must have steadiness and resolution, and firm adherence to our
own carefully thought-out policies.
We must avoid letting fear or lack of confidence -turn us from the
course that self-respect, decency and love of liberty point out. To
do so would be to dissipate the creative energies of our people upon
whom our real security rests. This we will never do.
Now to build toward peace and maintain free world security will
require action in every field of human enterprise. It can only be done
by the nations of the Free World working together in close coopera-
tion, adjusting their differences, sharing their common burdens, pur-
suing their common goals. We are carrying out just such an effort.
We call it mutual security.
*        *       *       *        *       *       *
Note from the American Embassy to the Soviet Foreign Ministry,
Proposing a Foreign Ministers Meeting at Geneva, March 26,
1959'1
The Government of the United States refers to the note of the
Government of the USSR of March 2, 1959, in response to the United
States note of February 16 proposing a conference of the Ministers
of Foreign Affairs of France, the USSR, the United Kingdom and
the United States.
The United States Government has consistently favored meetings
of interested powers that could provide opportunities for conducting
serious discussions of major problems and could be an effective means
of reaching agreement on significant subjects. It was for this reason
that the United States Government in its note of February 16 pro-
posed a meeting of the Foreign Ministers of France, the USSR, the
United Kingdom and the United States. The United States Govern-
ment notes with satisfaction the Soviet Government's agreement to
such a meeting.
Specifically, the United States Government proposes that a meeting
of France, the USSR, the United Kingdom and the United States at
the Foreign Minister level be convened in Geneva on May 11, 1959,
to consider questions relating to Germany, including a peace treaty
with Germany and the question of Berlin. Naturally, any of the
four participating governments should have the opportunity to pre-
1 Department of State press release 223, March 26, 1959.
409,


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